LET’S HOPE YOU NEVER MAKE A SPELLING MISTAKE, DAILY MAIL

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Grenfell was a tragedy in which 79 innocent people died.

The Daily Mail gives us all a spelling lesson.

Let’s hope that, revolution or not, there will soon NOT be a Daily Mail. It’s becoming as disreputable as The Sun.

 

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20 thoughts on “LET’S HOPE YOU NEVER MAKE A SPELLING MISTAKE, DAILY MAIL”

  1. We can now be quite, quite sure that the Barkers Centre in Kensington, home of the Daily Mail hate comic, is not clad in an aluminium / plastic composite material, I suppose. They leave a sick taste in the mouth, they really do.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes they do.

      I’ve had a laugh at the odd pompous person misspelling something on twitter, or getting their grammar wrong. It’s OK to do that, but after a disaster like Grenfell?

      What kind of animals inhabit the Daily Mail.

      You’d have thought that even their readership would have drawn the line at that.

      And they go on about Great British Values?

      Liked by 2 people

  2. tris the Daily Mail missspells ever single day in print

    Daily Mail should read ” Der Stürmer ”

    “Die Juden sind unser Unglück!”

    “Die Juden sind unser Unglück!” The Jews are our misfortune!

    [Slogan printed on the bottom of the anti-Semitic newspaper Der Stürmer]

    Or in this era ” The low waged the disabed the involuntary unemployed
    are our (the right wing ) misfortune !

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I regularly see people who, from their appearance, are working class buying the Daily Mail. I think, if we’re honest, we have to accept that a large proportion of the population agree with/support the Mail’s disgraceful, even inflammatory “views” on many issues. Niko refers to Der Stürmer: let’s not forget that much/most of the population of Germany were happy to support the antisemitic policies and actions of the Nazi party. Frankly, I don’t have any more faith in the “decency” of the current population of Britain. If nothing else, the Mail is a good gauge of how uncaring, even vicious a society we have in this country and, given the chance, I think there are major sections of the Tory party and their followers who would happily espouse openly racist policies. Sadly, many of those who see others as Untermenschen are themselves oafish, ill-educated knuckle-draggers but there are significant numbers of middle-class Mail readers who are like-minded. I think Europe will be glad to see the back of us.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. There are people all over who are like that, I guess.

      I’m shocked buy some of the crap that is believed.

      I had an argument with an elderly gentleman in my block the other day. His argument came straight from the pages of the Daily Mail.

      He’s retired now, but had been a factory worker all his days.

      I’m normally very polite to the neighbours, but I made an exception for him.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Foreigners, Brexit. He wants them all thrown out tomorrow.

          I wondered how he’d get all the treatment he needs at hospital…

          Ya know the kind of thing.

          Like

  4. Wealthy fascists don’t pay money to own newspapers so that they can inform the masses.
    For now,the printed media is the main channel for their right wing propaganda but as we saw with Murdoch’s reaction to Corbyn’s election success perhaps not for much longer.
    The internet represents a major threat to their hegemony and no doubt they will try to do something about that.
    Meantime,don’t pay these people a single penny.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Working people in the UK have suffered the greatest decline in wages since the financial crash of anyone except the Greeks (that’s true to the best of my knowledge and belief). Every other country in the developed world has seen wages increase. If I were a conspiracy theorist, I would say that the Tories deliberately engineered this with their damned Austerity, their “no magic money trees” except for banks, bankers and City institutions, their deliberately engineering huge government indebtedness which they then cite as justification for continuing the same failed policies of Austerity, and thereby creating a huge swathe of the population who are finding day-to-day living increasingly difficult both economically and spiritually. They have engineered despair and resentment.

    This is exactly the scenario you need for a good dose of scapegoating, blaming “migrants”, “scroungers”, undeserving not-really-disabled people, the poor in general, for the all of society’s ills. Once you’ve done that, you’ve made the country just ripe for a fascist takeover, eliminating human rights, hacking away at freedom and dissent, increasing the powers of the State, putting in place universal surveillance to guard against unspecified threats. Any terrorist attacks that somehow slip through the net can be used as justification for cracking down even further, of course.

    I might well think all that if I were a conspiracy theorist. Anyway, whether they did it deliberately or not, that is in fact what they’ve done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The way that the British government and its mates in the right wing press have behaved is reminiscent n many ways of German in the 30s.

      They have scapegoated the poor, unemployed, single mothers (regardless of circumstances…well except royal ones), the sick, the disabled, the foreigners, the elderly (who gave them the right to live this long?)

      And yes, the threat of terrorism means they have to know what everyone had for breakfast.

      Like

  6. Not too relevant to the post but a good guide for rebutting Leave arguments.

    Courtesy of david, from a post in Bella

    Very good. This seems an appropriate place to post my analysis of Project Brexit. I wrote it at the very end of last year. I wish I was wrong. I may well post it again somewhere in another six months, and keep doing so until we give the whole stupid idea up.
    Project Brexit
    I have spent much of the last forty years in the world of major project management. Largely in the oil and gas industry out of Aberdeen, but in other parts of the world as well and in other industries where projects get very big, such as nuclear power, defence and the largest of civil engineering jobs. My specific discipline – the software techniques used to understand and control these projects – is common across all of these industries, as are many, indeed most, of the theoretical frameworks we use to describe and manage these largest of jobs. I am flattered to be described as a “subject matter expert” by my clients in the oil and gas industry, however even SMEs have been quiet of late in the oil industry, and so I turned my attention to the largest project ever undertaken in Britain, Brexit.
    The important distinguishing feature of a project is that it stops. This is not manufacturing or running a shop. We make something, deliver it, and the job is over. Brexit is a project. But if we examine it that way without any consideration as to whether it is “right” or “wrong” to do, it is doomed to failure.
    In order for a project to be successful, there are some important ingredients. Brexit lacks all of them, except a “Project Must Finish By” date, the only information that we have. In March of 2019 the project finishes.
    Let me painfully go through just some of the missing ingredients:
    A scope of work. Famously, there isn’t one. It is as if a shipbuilding company had accepted a contract to deliver a ship in March 2019, but nobody knows what sort of ship. All we know is the launch date. This in itself makes the project to build the Holyrood parliament seem well founded in comparison.
    Budget. There isn’t one. This project will go ahead no matter what it costs.
    Contract Management. We have started this job without knowing what the terms and conditions are. Any of them. I cannot think of an analogy that expresses my horror at this strongly enough, other than to repeat it. We have started this job without knowing what the terms and conditions are. We are going to negotiate the T&Cs as we go along. How many times has that worked?
    Benefit analysis. If you believe £350m a week for the NHS, you will believe anything I suppose, but in fairness there was a benefit analysis available this June from the proponents of the project. I do not think I am being too partisan if I suggest it has not stood up to scrutiny. In essence – there isn’t one.
    Deliverables. All projects of this size have a list of deliverables, rather than a single event. The channel tunnel for example had operational parameters of availability, running costs, number of passengers, there will have been more I am sure. There are no quantified deliverables for Brexit. “less immigration” “more manufacturing jobs” are aspirations, not numbers. This inflates dramatically the impact of my next heading:
    Expectations. When we spend this much money on a project, there are expectations which have to be met. If, for example, our shipyard successfully builds two new ferries, but the service to users on the routes they are deployed on does not improve, then it is likely that the expectations of the users of the project will not be met and the project may not be deemed a success. What do people expect from this project? Everyone has been allowed to invent their own expectations. Madness must ensue. For some it is control of immigration, for some it is leaving the single market, for some “taking back control” whatever that means. One could argue that with no scope of work, no budget, no benefit study and no deliverables, expectation management is impossible. I do argue that. And that means we have no way to measure:
    Success. There is no way to measure this. The project must then fail.
    I could carry on for a few thousand words more about what is wrong/missing with this project. Can I see the risk register? I thought not.
    I am often called in to project control environments to help improve them. I certainly have plenty experience of projects that could have gone better. The simple truth I have observed is that success or failure is determined at or before the start, not the end of a project. Project success is a function of how ready we are to start the project. In more that forty years I have never seen a project less ready to start.
    At the risk of tautology, this is technically the worst project I have ever experienced, and I’ve been parachuted into some lulus. It is hardly started and we are at the Supreme Court already.
    All of the above just spells failure. Indeed I suspect Brexit cannot be done at all.
    All I can think of to make it better, is comfort eating.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Abu. Excellent. I don’t have this guy’s experience.

      But I know that projects do have to be managed within the parameters.

      And before you even start you have to know what your objectives are.

      Clearly, as he points out, the Brits have never run a project!

      Like

  7. Tris,

    I am taking this opportunity to wish all readers, particularly Muslim ones, a goo Eid Mubarak/Selamat Hari Raya Aidilfitri. For us, it will be tomorrow.

    I hope to send you the very much delayed guest posts soon. It had been a particularly busy Ramadan this year.

    Again, Eid Mubarak to all.

    ABU

    Liked by 2 people

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