WHY IN 2018, IN A RICH EUROPEAN NATION, ARE PEOPLE STARVING TO DEATH?

Amber Rudd, yeah, remember her, the one who lied her backside off about Windrush, and yet 6 months later is back in Cabinet, seemed to think that the raconteur was being unnecessarily political in the language of his report.

The thing is, in one of the world’s rich countries, why is it, if not by political choice, that 20% of the population lives in real poverty?

Why are kids growing up in abject poverty, going to school too hungry to concentrate?  Why are teachers having to bring in food?

Why cannot we set the minimum wage at a wage that people could afford to live on?

Why do people in a country that proudly punches above its weight in any and every conflict that America orders it into, have to beg for food in food banks?

brexpens

Why are our retirement pensions in the region of £7,500 while German ones are at £26,000?

Surely if we can’t match the German rate (who could) we could at least manage to equal the French?

These are political decisions. We clearly value older people far less than our French and German neighbours.

These, apparently, are the great British values of which the Brit politicians never tire of quoting, without actually telling us what they are.

We must cut taxes for the super wealthy and devil take the hindmost? Pull yourself up by the bootstraps, even if you can’t afford any boots.

Do you seriously wonder that so many Scots want to get the hell out of this awful country?

**********

Image result for great british values

We hear a lot about Great British Values (GBV)

Just for a laugh… but also seriously, what do you think these GBV are?

EDIT:

Thanks to Niko for this. It leaves me speechless and.át the same time, utterly seething with anger, frustration and horror.

WE COULD DO BETTER

!pension

Scotland, I suspect, would not feel obliged to punch above its weight so it might have money to pay a pension that approaches that of some of our neighbours.

We might also be able to ensure that people had enough money to buy food and stay warm 52 weeks of the year.

And maybe our health service would be something to be even more proud of it we spent the same percentage of our GDP as say, Japan, Germany or France.

Just a thought…

RANDOM THOUGHTS

 

a irel
Nope, mate. You hold all the cards.
£!7
Well, you and Arlene, of course.
a kids in poverty EU
Proud of punching above our weight in a lot of things, but clearly not kids’ poverty. Ex-communist countries like the Czech Republic, Estonia and  Slovakia are doing better!
aaaaaaa
I see these Britain First people speak really good British.
a trump2
Not sure there are a lot of people who are fit to walk in the footsteps of Mr Mandela.  But Trump’s not fit to walk in the footsteps of Atilla the Hun!
danny1
Oooops. Forgot, huh?
afruit
What with that and apprenticeships pensioners won’t need a pension to live on…
apension
…which is just as well, given that you couldn’t live on it…
apension1
…however, fortunately,  important people don’t have to.
britian
Ring any bells as to which country they are talking about?
inflation ps sal
And that’s serious stuff…
aeejit
Unlike this tube with his kilt on backside fore. What a wally.

 

 

RANDOM THOUGHTS

A1

It’s little wonder that Philip Mountbatten-Windsor-Saxe-Coburg-Gotha has had to go on working till he was 96.

Have you seen the state of the British Pension?

Hard enough for Mr Average to manage down the pub on a Saturday evening,  but when you mix in the best of circles, you really can’t do it on £7,500 a year.

**********

aaa

Well, I don’t remember any of that being in the manifesto, do you?

**********afishermen

Then a Scottish MEP, doing his best to get Scottish funding diverted elsewhere in the United Kingdom. Now a member of the aristocracy and a nobleman second-tier minister for Scotland. I imagine that he won’t be fighting hard for the Scottish fishermen in ministerial meetings. Kinda suckered all the fishermen who voted Tory. Still, I’m sure his dithering boss, Fluffy, the tea boy of the cabinet (no sugar, splash of cream, Mundell), will put up a spirited fight for them. After all, who can forget his brave cries of: “I won’t let that happen” when Mrs May paid the DUP a billion plus as a bribe to keep her in a job?

**********amuddle

anic

Or maybe not, Fluffy!!!

According to Wikipedia, Nicola is two places above Muddle in the great scheme of things, which includes royals, dukes, people from the established church, Commonwealth people and some real jokes (Princesses Eugenie and Charlotte anyone?).

The list is worth looking at for comedic value.

 

a£
Talking about comedic value, Trussy looks nearly as stupid as Govey did when he wore it.

 

None of it comes as any great surprise in Ruritania, except the inclusion at number 11 of the Lord High Chancellor, one Liz Truss, who I thought, was something to do with the English justice system….Justice Minister with a very silly uniform. And she’s above Theresa May…  And all the Scottish ministers. Is that because she has an even more ridiculous outfit than they do?

**********

eubrder

What was that you people were going on about? Controlling borders? Security?

If you guys think this is bad… you ain’t seen nothing yet.

!£

PROMISE ON PENSIONS?

Margaret Thatcher began her pension reforms with the Social Security Act of 1980. This saw the correlation between average earnings and state pension increases severed, with the aim to reduce public spending. Pensions were treated like unemployment and sickness benefits (generally accepted as being short-term in nature) and increased in line with inflation.

aend4

Inevitably this meant that the value of state pensions, like other “benefits” reduced over time and the UK system is now one of the least generous, when compared with average earnings, in the developed world. Despite great pressure from people like Barbara Castle, the Labour governments from 1997 – 2010 did nothing to reverse this. The “triple lock” (meaning that pensions should rise by, inflation, average earnings or 2%, whichever was the greatest) was introduced by the Cameron-Clegg government in 2011 as a way to try to redress this and, unless I’m misreading her, Theresa has not ruled out, indeed has hinted at, its abolition.

aend5

It is said that Britain cannot afford even this niggardly pension due to the rise in the number of people annually reaching retirement age, and their propensity, having reached it, to live much longer than they used to. It is true that pensions cost over £100 billion a year, and that due to mismanagement of finances over the years, not a single penny of this is “funded”. In short, it has to come out of current taxation. Apparently, no one had the foresight to account for the inevitable ageing of the baby boomers or, despite it being a gradual process, the lengthening of life expectancy.

Of course, the pension age is rising to 66 by 2020, and then to 68 by 2028… and presumably on an ever upward trajectory as life expectation rises. But this will make little difference to the overall cost, as vast numbers of 60+ people are unemployed and although life expectancy has increased, people are not necessarily proportionally healthier as they grow older.

aend1

I was somewhat surprised to see the Express’s front page story about Mrs May being more popular than any other prime minister since Churchill on the basis of her pensions pledge. I thought what she said was pretty ambiguous.

Of course pensions will rise. Even under Mrs Thatcher they rose. But Hammond has hinted that they may be subject to the same sort of restraints as other benefits…ie a reduction in real value.

amay

All is not lost though. If you wish to do well as an OAP you could do worse than become an MP. They seem to have received generous pay increases in the recent past, and of course, at £300 a day, a peer of the realm is well rewarded for snoozing his life away.

aend