WHAT GOES AROUND COMES AROUND

AAA

A few months ago it was announced that, for the first time in a long time, life expectancy in Scotland had stagnated. Mr Tomkins was quick to imply that blame lay with the Scottish government.

Photo of Adam TomkinsAdam Tomkins Conservative

5. To ask the Deputy First Minister for what reason life expectancy is no longer increasing in Scotland. (S5F-00982)

The Deputy First Minister will know that life expectancy levels in the east end of Glasgow are dramatically lower than those in other, more affluent parts of the city. The Commonwealth games offered an unparalleled opportunity to take specific action to reduce health inequalities and mortality rates in the neighbourhoods that hosted the games, yet it seems that no targets were set to achieve that. The London boroughs that hosted the 2012 Olympics set themselves the explicit target of narrowing the gap between male and female life expectancies in the east end and those in the rest of London. Does the Deputy First Minister agree that Glasgow should follow London’s lead on that? What actions will the Scottish ministers take to address the health inequalities that persist in Glasgow?

 

afrankie
Glasgow

Today, we note that the same observation has been made about life expectancy in England.

 

Rising rates of life expectancy are grinding to a halt in England after more than 100 years of continuous progress, says a leading health expert.

University College London expert Sir Michael Marmot said he was “deeply concerned” by the situation, calling it “historically highly unusual”.

He said it was “entirely possible” austerity was to blame and said the issue needed looking at urgently.

But the government said its policies were not responsible.

The Department of Health said ministers were providing the necessary support and funding to ensure life expectancy “continues to increase”.

 

A!
London

 

Going back to Mr Tomkins’ query, I’m a little bemused as to why he thinks we would have seen an increase in life expectancy so soon after the Olympics or the Commonwealth games. The “healthy” legacy in terms of increase in sporting participation was not designed, in either London or Glasgow, for those who might be in the 70s, 80s and 90s. Rather, it was directed towards the young.

We won’t be able to tell for many a year whether this has worked to lengthen life, the main benefactors of the sporting legacy being likely still to be in their teens and 20s. However, the Scottish professor might like to note that (according to Wikipedia) :

Criticisms and concerns:

Criticism of the London 2012 legacy includes the legacy not meeting its original ambitions with a decrease in 2014/15 in the number of people playing sport for at least half an hour a week of 125,100.[29]

 

England Fans
It would, I suppose, be fair to mention that an interest in sport is not always as much of an advantage as we might at first assume.

 

A report on the legacy of the Commonwealth games (dated 2015) shows an increase in some sporting participation. Does anyone know if that has been maintained? It could well be that Scotland has followed the English legacy, despite the spending of a considerable amount to try to encourage young people into sport. At the end of the day regardless of nationality, no matter how many facilities you provide, if young people prefer video games to actual physical exercise, there is not a lot anyone can do about about it.

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It also seems appropriate to point out that as we helped to pay for the Olympics in London, we should also have been on the receiving end of the legacy from the English games.

I’d like to suggest that in all probability, the reasons for the levelling out of life expectancy   are far more complex than could be covered in this post, but that one of the many contributing factors might be austerity which has been forced upon people from the four nations of the UK by the Conservative government in London.

Whatcha say Mr Tomkins?

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Ha ha ha ha ha ha…

 

amay9
I knew if we kept her long enough, we’d find a use for her.
abg
Stayin’ alive?
ammt
Munguin wishes to echo these sentiments. If there’s any left over Munguin Towers needs some paint.
ammt1
NO. My chancellor says you get far too much anyway. Go away.
ammt3
Sorry, peeps. Arlene cleared me out.
atrump (1)
Trumpisgreat? Thanks to David for sending.

 

SOPPY SUNDAY

 

Quite a few people requested stuff over the last few weeks. I hope I’ve not left anyone out. Feel free to request your favourite animal/scene/country. Munguin’ll try to cover it. Oh, and if, perchance he forgets (because he’s a very busy media mogul), just gently remind him.

n ornag2
About time you arrived. I’ve been waiting for ages
n black bird
Is there anything prettier than a Blackbird’s singing…in the dead of night?
n saltwater croc
Saltwater Crock!
n octopus
Octopus for Danny.
n cecils cubs
Who’d hunt an animal like this for sport, leaving behind cubs?
n cephalopods
Cephalopod for Douglas.
n donegal castle
Donegal Castle for Conan.
n horses water
You can lead a horse to water…
n sutherland
Sutherland.
n piranah-
Piranah.
n vampire bat
Vampire Bat.
n Torres del Paine chile
Torres del Paine, Chile.
n pristine peacock
Pristine Peacock.
n racoon
Rocky Racoon.
n moussa's castle leb
Moussa’s Castle, Lebanon, for John and Mrs Brownlie. Have a good holiday.
n cephalopods3
Another cephalopod for Douglas.
n Narsaq (South Greenland)
Narsak, Greenland.
n moss
The magic of moss.
n mates
Everyone has a best mate. Not everyone has ears that their mate can sleep under though!
N orang4
Well, I hope your visit was enjoyable. I’m here for Panda Paws, by the way. See you next Sunday.

 

YOU’D THINK THEY’D LEARN

On reflection, no, you wouldn’t…

 

a
Good negotiating tactic there, Boris. What an asset you are to the UK team.

 

Before and during the campaign leading to the referendum on withdrawal from the EU, it is rumoured (and widely accepted) that David Cameron refused to allow anyone in government or the civil service to contemplate, even for a second, the possibility that his (remain) side would lose.

Indeed when Nicola Sturgeon said “You could lose this, David”, he replied, “Don’t be silly”.

As a result, when the admittedly unexpected result came in not one single plan was in place.

The EU had a set of rules and regulations by which it had to act. It only had to appoint a few people to make up the negotiating team which would work within these rules and regulations.

The British side had nothing. No plan, no staff, no negotiators, no trade people, no ideas, no knowledge. No nothing.

a1

During our referendum, I remember Alistair Darling (his nobleness) rant on and on about the YES campaign not having a Plan B if the UK government refused to allow an independent Scotland to use the pound. Of course, it would have been impossible and illegal for them to do this. But without cooperation from the British Treasury and Bank of England, it might have been awkward for Scotland. But of course, the YES campaign did have an alternative plan. It’s just that a Scottish pound, tied to the British pound made more sense both for Scotland and the UK, something which the Bank of England an anonymous government minister admitted. Having a Plan B then seemed to be incredibly important for the Brits.

Having a Plan B at that time seemed to be incredibly important for the Brits. What changed?

Now, I’m not convinced that the self-same Brits have much of a Plan A, but we now have it from the near top of the government that they haven’t prepared for anything to go wrong?

What arrogance.  Can they be saying that Mrs May’s plan is so perfect there is no need for an alternative? Her history hardly suggests that that is a starter.

Can you believe this lot?