Plus ça change, plus c’est pareil… à travers les années

So John sent me some cuttings from Private Eye over the last 10 years or so. We thought it would be good to show that somethings never really change.

Dates shown, where I know them.

2012
2014
2016. The Express challenges the Beano for comic supremacy.
2016. The news you WANT to hear wherever you are. Note: I think that the Eye may have over-egged the English vote. I’d say that 53.3% of the vote is not “by and large for”.

Thanks John…

17 thoughts on “Plus ça change, plus c’est pareil… à travers les années”

  1. Depressing, innit? Having the bahstahds rip control over our lives out of our hands, I mean.

    I prescribe Scottish independence first and Prozac second: real change beats medication. You can have too much talking therapy alone.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m worried that some of those elected to deliver said independence act as if they have been double vaccinated against it. Whilst I don’t expect a referendum tomorrow, I do expect the necessary planning and policy development to be in progress or indeed have finished or near as damn it.

      Your last paragraph may only have contained two sentences but what compelling sentences they were. I’ve seen roofs with fewer nails hit on the head!

      Liked by 3 people

  2. S’il vous plaît arrêtez de me faire utiliser google translate le matin!

    I mean I thought I knew what the headline said but you never can be too sure when you are a STEM grad.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Désolé, madame.

      But it’s good for you, is a bit of research… and it will serve you well for when Munguin brings out his French edition!.

      Like

  3. I always quoted that French phrase as “Plus ça change, plus c’est la meme chose”.

    Have I been wrong all these years? Hang on a minute, I’ll ask my French colleague . . .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, both are correct and both are, I think, equally used.

      You might say it’s like “six and half a dozen” and “six and two threes”.

      Like

          1. First I heard of sic and two threes was from the RS so I thought it might be a national thing – Scots use half a dozen; English two threes. From what you say here, now not so sure. Perhaps two threes usage has become more common in the 50 years I’ve been away.

            As for ‘Plus ca change’ etc, can’t find an OED reference for English usage history, but Mr Google quickly came up with the source: An epigram by Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr in the January 1849 issue of his journal Les Guêpes (‘The Wasps’). But who was he? #

            That too didn’ttake long to find out, and MNR (as usual) became another schoolday… Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr (24 November 1808 – 29 September 1890) was a French critic, journalist, and novelist. In 1855 he went to live in Nice, where he indulged his predilections for floriculture, and gave his name to more than one new variety, notably the dahlia (New International Encyclopedia).

            Indeed, he practically founded the trade in cut flowers on the French Riviera. He was also devoted to fishing, and in Les Soirées de Sainte-Adresse (1853) and Au bord de la mer (1860) he made use of his experiences. His reminiscences, Livre de bord, were published in 1879–1880. He died at Saint-Raphaël (Var).

            I think M Karr would definitely ualify as a Munguinite, were he still with us.

            Liked by 1 person

  4. The truth of the matter is that although ‘Lessons will be learned’ we continue to ignore even recent history.
    In the 1850’s, take a loaf of bread to feed hungry children, get transported to Australia.
    Modern times, decide not to feed children at schools and get a seat in the Lords, the best of the benefits cheats.
    The vote to stop benefits for a third child gets you made a baroness.
    Donate half a million to the tory party and get a PPE contract.

    Liked by 1 person

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