SOPPY SUNDAY

1.

2. Australian Sunset.
3.
4. Come on. I’ve not got all day to hang around waiting for you. I got swimming things to do.

This fine animal, you will recognise as Howard, lately of Bulgaria and now of Kendal in North England. Kay tracked him down on Facebook where he has been posting pictures of himself and his exploits. John writes “His new people say he’s settled in very well, enjoying himself, well behaved, and well trained. So the RS did a good job (as did his previous owners). He has been introduced to the sea – must be the first time he’s seen it – and took to swimming like a duck.  Don’t think Kendal is within walking distance of the sea so that must have been a car trip.
 
They also took him to the woods and he immediately reverted to Bulgarian hunting dog, picking u the spoor of deer and rabbits and again enjoying himself hugely. Great to find out that he has such a happy home and people who obviously have taken to him straight away. And he to them. “

Great to see you wee Howard. So glad you’ve settled in.
5. “You should be ashamed of the UK Government” Oh yeah, I should have explained. I’m a mockingbird.
6. Mosses can be beautiful too, you know.
7. Not as nice as little chics though. I’m so nice they took two photographs of me.
8. I’ve smartened myself up for this one!
9. ANCHORAGE, AK –
The bloody battle to save the red squirrel | Science | AAAS
10. So, did you bring nuts?
11. Jealous, much!
12. Anyone give me directions to the Belfry?
How we found coronavirus in a cat
13. Stay back… unless you have treats!
Moment of hope in sadness as rescue donkey bonds with new friend after  companion's death - Horse & Hound
14. Let’s bond, bro.
15. The Long and Winding Road.
16. Did you ever see such a handsome tree as me?
17. Ready with the shower, you guys?
18. This fellow insisted that you can’t have too many cats in a Soppy Sunday… and I felt disinclined to argue!
19. I can sleep standing up.
20. So, that’s your lot. Thanks for coming. Pay on the way out… See you next week.

Thanks to David, Andi, John and to the RS and Kay for finding and sharing the photograph of Howard.

80 thoughts on “SOPPY SUNDAY”

  1. Awwww, lovely. Howard looks well. You’ll be glad to hear that having seen the tv series, Carla and Clarita both recover from their nasty rash and have re-bonded. Adorable penguin. The masked cat is surely photoshopped? And a multiple shower thanks to the elephants.

    That all fair cheered me up. If Ed were here, he might even call it life-affirming.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. You took the words right out of my mouth, PP!

      I feel cheered. I am feeling pretty rotten after my COVID jag – not everybody does – but I choose that to mean that my immune system is mounting a sooper-dooper response and will protect me vehemently against the current plague.

      I have people coming in to Tend to my Needs, i.e., care assistants, but do you think I can get them to say “There, there, you’ll feel better soon” to me? Not a chance. So those pics provided some much needed uplift. Loved’em all.

      On the subject of uplifts, I’ve got a pile of stuff the Council needs to come and perform said operation on, but hey, just another first-world problem, right?

      Liked by 3 people

      1. You and me both Ed, I’ve had nausea, vomiting, splitting headaches, massive arm reaction and urticaria over the torso. It does mean the body is going to war with the vaccine. I’ve been told that for a few of us unfortunates, this can last for up to 3 weeks. Meanwhile older sibling has just breezed through it, as have the neighbours etc.

        So there, there you’ll feel better soon.

        Feel free to reciprocate!

        Liked by 3 people

        1. Thanks for that, PP – well, maybe not about the three weeks! You’re in a worse case than me, obviously, I’ve got no skin problems, just a slightly achey arm – but episodes of fever, sweats, splitting headache (after paracetamol and tramadol!), and that pain in all muscles and joints you get with the flu. Also cold symptoms: sneezes, runny nose, stuffed sinuses… I’m still glad I had it. I hope the second dose will be easier.

          This is probably Too Much Information for those of a sensitive disposition, so I shall now shut my gob and keep it that way.

          Liked by 2 people

          1. Thanks Ed but I’d say you’re a worse case than me. I don’t even have tramadol far less it not touch the sides.

            If this how we react to the inactive vaccine heaven only knows what assault our bodies would have leashed on the real virus!

            Liked by 2 people

            1. I guess that’s the way to look at it, PP.

              One of my care assistants had actually had the virus – and not a case requiring hospitalization either. I asked her what it was like, and she replied with one word: “brutal”.

              On Sun, 7 Mar 2021 at 15:02, MUNGUIN’S NEW REPUBLIC wrote:

              > panda paws commented: “Thanks Ed but I’d say you’re a worse case than me. > I don’t even have tramadol far less it not touch the sides. If this how we > react to the inactive vaccine heaven only knows what assault our bodies > would have leashed on the real virus!” >

              Liked by 2 people

            2. I guess that’s the way to look at it, PP.

              One of my care assistants had actually had the virus – and not a case requiring hospitalization either. I asked her what it was like, and she replied with one word: “brutal”.

              Liked by 2 people

              1. My pal, a doctor, has been working on the Covid ward. The volumes are down a lot, but those who are hospitalised are seriously ill.

                He says that the mask deniers and people who have parties and what have you ignoring the rules, should be taken to see what it is like trying to get over Covid.

                Liked by 1 person

                1. My seventy year old mate had it last year. He was in hospital incommunicado for a week (no phone, or not capable of using one). It took him a couple of months to fully recover.
                  Thankfully, I just got a sair airm and ‘flu symptoms for a couple of days after my jag.

                  Liked by 2 people

                    1. Tris……Glad to hear that you had no serious side effects. Most people I’m personally acquainted with here had only mild effects at worst. But the reports of people who experience really uncomfortable flu-like symptoms like Ed and Panda Paws are quite concerning. One encouraging thing is that uncounted tens of millions of inoculations have now been given, and no previously unidentified life threatening side effects have occurred.

                      Liked by 2 people

                    2. Oh yes. I agree, Danny. It’s a relatively rare thing to have a bad reaction to it.

                      Frequent reminder from Mason (my pal who is a medical dr) what it is like on the local Covid ward, means I’d take 5 days feeling sick to actually having the virus.

                      Some people who have the virus get it bad and some barely have any symptoms and we know there are those who are totally asymptomatic.

                      I wonder if there is some sort of correlation there with the vaccine reactions?

                      Liked by 2 people

                    3. That seems to be a possibility Tris. We have a family friend who talked to a doctor friend who was giving vaccinations at a big public vaccination site in New York City. He got the Pfizer vaccine and asked about the severity of side effects. The doctor said that although there is not yet statistical verification of it, one view is that some people who have had the worst side effects may be people who have been infected in the past but remained asymptomatic.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    4. Very interesting indeed, Danny. Quite a lot of us over here – in Scotland, anyway – have been wondering if the virus was around before anyone realized it, because loads of people were very ill the December before it hit the news – I myself ended up in Ninewells [local University teaching hospital] once, and was ill for months after with recurrent pneumonia.

                      Liked by 2 people

                    5. Ed……That’s really very frightening. Given the often asymptomatic aspect of the disease, it does seem likely that it was around quite a while before it made the news, and was probably making people ill before it was being diagnosed.

                      Liked by 2 people

                1. I did too, for the same reason, PP, but the nurses didn’t cavil at my choice – though loads of folk injecting me in similar circumstances have. An “Are you sure you want it in that arm?” is OK by me, but I once had someone who absolutely refused to give whatever it was in my right arm. Some people just cannot get their heads around some of us being left-handed. I think now I should have stood on my rights and refused to have whatever it was in my left arm, walked out, and found someone else to give it to me.

                  Liked by 2 people

                  1. I’m left handed too… Straw poll on Munguin’s republicans, who is left handed. Anyone?

                    Like

                    1. Right but with left tendencies and sympathies.
                      Meaning fine motor skills, right. Other stuff, a bit like Munguin I flip between the two.

                      Liked by 2 people

            1. Unfortunately (fortunately?), it’s not my arm that’s sore or broken out in an allergic reaction. I still feel as if I have flu – but I’m considering myself lucky, on the assumption that if this is what the vaccine is doing to me, then the real thing would have provoked that same extreme immune reaction that would have seen me in hospital, my lungs or something else destroyed, and quite probably dead.

              Surely the second dose won’t be this bad?

              Liked by 2 people

            1. PandaPaws…..I thought of the CDC guidance as soon as I read what you wrote. (The CDC guidelines are considered reliable now that the Trump people have been fired from the agency.) So it would seem to be prudent to bring up the matter when you get the second inoculation. This seems especially the case since the American experience, at least with the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines now in use in the States, is that the reaction to the second shot has often been more intense than that from the first one.

              However, I don’t really know if a similar second-shot reaction also applies to the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine that’s in use in the UK. The Oxford vaccine is, as you know, a viral vector vaccine using a chimpanzee virus, whereas Pfizer and Moderna are Messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines.

              Liked by 1 person

                1. Ed……One thing to consider is that this American experience involves two different vaccines (the mRNA vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna) that are being given in the States, and not the Oxford-AstraZeneca virus-based vaccine being given in the UK. So I don’t know if the second dose experience is the same in the UK as in the USA. Your doctor would know of course.

                  The side effects vary widely, and I’ve even read that a few people who had very uncomfortable effects from the first shot had less severe effects from the second. Your doctor should be made aware of your experience of course, but in the US, even people who experienced really strong side effects like fever, chills, headaches, body aches, and other flu like symptoms, are advised to go ahead and get the second shot. Considering the tens of millions of inoculations so far, extreme life-threatening reactions have been rare. Still, you’re required to wait at least 15 minutes before leaving the inoculation site, where doctors and medical equipment is on hand.

                  Liked by 1 person

                  1. Thanks for that, Danny!

                    You’re right, I should call my GP. I’ll do that now. I know that the AstraZeneca vaccine I had isn’t like the Moderna or Pfizer ones, so you’re right, maybe the second dose won’t be as bad.

                    The nurses who gave me my injection didn’t hang around afterwards; they just packed up an left. Still, they knew I’m in accommodation where I can press a panic button or pull an orange cord to send an ambulance winging my way.

                    Liked by 2 people

                    1. Ed……One of the most encouraging things is that untold tens of millions of vaccinations have already been done in the USA and UK (probably hundreds of millions around the world,) and the occurrence of life threatening allergic reaction has been next to nothing. The CDC announced this back in mid-December:

                      CDC: “During December 14–23, 2020, monitoring by the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System detected 21 cases of anaphylaxis after administration of a reported 1,893,360 first doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine (11.1 cases per million doses); 71% of these occurred within 15 minutes of vaccination.”

                      Since then, the Biden administration has gotten the Trump vaccination mess sorted out, 90 million Americans have been vaccinated as of Sunday, with no unanticipated life threatening anaphylaxis (which requires an epinephrine injection as I understand it.) So having received one injection already with no such allergic reaction, I would think that your danger on that score, rare as it is anyway, is effectively nil for a second inoculation.

                      Take care and best wishes! Hope you’re feeling better soon.

                      Liked by 1 person

                  2. I think it’s a good idea to mention to the medic who gives you the injection that you had a bad reaction with all the details.

                    I also think it’s a good idea if there is isolation space to have people wait for a short time before leaving.

                    Liked by 1 person

                    1. Tris……I’ve been told by people who’ve gotten the vaccination at large public sites, that there’s been socially distanced waiting areas where people wait for 15 minutes. Or in questionable cases as I understand it, up to 3o minutes to see if an epinephrine injection or other intervention is required. Severe allergic reactions are very very rare, but this is in line with CDC guidelines.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    2. Tris….Panda Paws posted a comment in the next MNR entry which said that “there were two very severe reaction in the UK (anaphylaxis) to the Pfizer vaccine when health care workers were being vaccinated. So they decided that anyone with a history of severe reactions wouldn’t get it.”

                      Liked by 1 person

      2. Both of us got our jags a couple of weeks ago, the AstraZeneca one. I felt a bit lack lustre for about 5 days, slight headache would come and go. It affected my partner badly, had to take her to A E one night, all ok now. I could attribute all our symtoms to dehydration. It could be the body making new blood cells that causes the dehydration 🤷‍♂️.

        Liked by 2 people

          1. Oh dear. I’m glad you’re both better now. I’m just starting day 5, so maybe I’ll be alright by tomorrow.

            News of all you fellow severe-reactors has prevented me from troubling deaf heaven with bootless cries of “Why me?”.

            Liked by 3 people

    1. Indeed. Munguinites may not be aware that the Portuguese for baobab is “embondeiro” (or baobá). The former is not to be confused with “bondeiro”; if you say you’ve seen a big one of those, people are likely to laugh, or suggest you mean “bombeiro”. The baobab has a special place in West African culture – famed for its staunch resilience, it can survive severe drought and locusts, for example, where everything else dries. Its fruit is edible, as is the dried pulp, so as it can save lives when other crops shrivel up and die. Can’t say I like the fruit stuff much, though.

      It’s so special that some say it’s symbolized in the national flag of Senegal, as many Munguinites undoubtedly know already, as I myself discovered from my Senegalese colleague and friend Moussa, who worked with me as the French translator at one of the international tribunals in The Hague. A wonderful guy he was; mother tongue Wolof, he was also a very talented artist, among other things. Used to do things like send home watercolours of his house showing the exact shade of blue he wanted the external woodwork painted. He’s gone now, alas; I miss him.

      Here’s Wikipedia on the subject: https://is.gd/xOQVoL.

      But I digress, to everyone’s enormous surprise, I’m sure. What I wanted to say is that the emondeiro features in this song by Mariza, and possibly says something about the sculptural guy in the video. The song, in the fado genre, is entitled “Quem me dera”, which translates loosely as “If only”. I expect Munguinites will appreciate too the landscapes and the subtext: https://youtu.be/-sze5rpbklM.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. It occurred to me to wonder what the differences were between listeners who understand the lyrics and those who don’t, so I googled around desultorily and found a couple of vocal coaches reacting to it (I didn’t know that “reaction” videos were a Thing, but now I do), both of whom did the “Music = universal language” shtick, but really – understanding the words enhances the experience a lot.

          I remember my best bro Mounir putting on a recording of Umm Kulthum (THE Arabic-language classical songstress), and I muttered something along the lines of “can’t be doing with that waily Arabic music” – to which Mounir reacted by going back and starting the track again, this time telling me in English or French what she was actually saying. At that point I got it.

          So – here’s a reaction from a cute young Brazilian, wearing an impressively silly bobble hat, to Mariza singing Quem me dera: https://youtu.be/RB7fhWTMM-I?t=212. Skip to about 3:25 to miss the blurby bit, but get an idea of how the guy usually talks.

          “Incrível” = incredible, unbelievable. “Meu deus” = my God”. “Que voz” = what a voice.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. I think music and lyrics can both be moving… as can a brilliant performance.

            I’ve certainly been moved by musical arrangements alone. But a touching lyric can make all the difference.

            Liked by 1 person

  2. Scrolling through the pictures, each one getting “awws” or “wow” (No 11 was a wow, would love to live there), then getting to the incredibly lovely and soo cute penguin.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Tatu, Tris – The house is in a lovely situation indeed and it also has a wonderful outlook over the River Clyde to the landscape beyond – a des res for sure.

        Liked by 2 people

    1. Wonderful stuff, Conan. I love the Unthanks – one of my favourites is “Tar Barrel in Dale”. I didn’t realise until hearing it that folks in Northumberland went first-footing.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve just seen Tompkins saying it was good to be back on top again, where, apparently, they belong.

      The queen will be pleased.

      Water canon I’d say. Regardless of which side they are on.

      Like

      1. You really have to wonder at them when so many people have sacrificed so much over the last year.

        I understand that the police can’t arrest them all. Nowhere to put them for a start. And I even accept that the police had to “escort” them for the safety of decent humans.

        Id have been inclined to use water canon?

        Like

        1. Water cannon? I remember Boris buying up a whole load of the things while he was Mayor of London, but the courts said they were illegal so it was all for nothing.

          Typical Boris, of course.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Theresa May when she was Home Secretary told him he couldn’t use them. They are now illegal in England and Wales.

            Boris’s were sold for scrap. Like a lot of the stuff he comes up with…

            Like

          2. From Wiki:

            Water cannon use outside Northern Ireland is not approved, and would require the statutory authorisation of Parliament in England, or of the devolved assemblies in Wales and the parliament of Scotland.

            Like

      1. Tris says that you said it overlooks the Clyde, at one time Lanark, Clyde valley, Tillietudlem was my entertainment area (youth time). The rocks in your image don’t fit though. Could it be along the road, heading North, after the Erskine Bridge, is that Yoker?

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.