ALL OUR YESTERDAYS

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19. Donald Trump is reported to have said that when he was younger people said he looked like Elvis, which I suppose if you were blind, he did, a bit.
Va-Voom Vintage: How To Wash Vintage Clothes | Vintage-werbung,  Werbeplakat, Nostalgie
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Thanks to Dave and John.

121 thoughts on “ALL OUR YESTERDAYS”

  1. Pic 7 – Alma Cogan “The girl with a giggle in her voice” and John Lennon. Pic 10 – Princess Alexandra and hubby Angus Ogilvy. Pic 17 – Cliff Michelmore – anchor of “Tonight” on BBC, back in the day (whatever that means). Pic 18 – Glesca – probably back courts in the Gorbals but could be Springburn, Maryhill, almost anywhere – the “good old days.”

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    1. Cliff Michelmore looks like a sinister molester who would never have been on intimate terms with Moira Anderson despite his owning an estate adjacent to that of Moira on the Isle of Man near the concentration camp theme park. Did he become a Conservative MP? His wife, Jean Metcalfe, used to present Forces Favourites on BBC radio on a Sunday where patriotic neo-nazis could send requests to their military relatives posted in Akrotiri or BFPO69 so they could hear Max Bygraves singing about a mouse in old Amsterdam. British culture is world beating.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. He does look sinister, a bit like a war criminal. I think it’s the glasses.

        Here’s Cliff on a truly bizarre bit of telly featuring a very young David Bowie.

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    2. Aye, you’re right about No.18 andi. Could be my backcourt in the 1940/50s. Although I was born, as I never tire of telling folk, that I was actually born about 100 metres South of the Maryhill Burgh boundary, upmarket North Kelvin as it was then, todays Woodside.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Got it DonDon. The pic is from a 1968 Time-Life book ‘Guide to Science’, taken at Boeing’s vertical take off and landing (VTOL) plant. Doesn’t say where, so you’re probably right with Philadelphia as those in the background are indeed Chinooks, ‘designed to carry 44 fully-equipped soldiers into combat’. In the foreground are Sea Knights ‘for Army and Marine rescue and transport’.

      The story describes helicopters as a ‘recent military innovation’, but the main thrust is how helicopter science was being applied to aircraft, and VTOL commercial jets would soon be taking passengers direct to the heart of cities instead of outlying airports. Already, the world’s biggest conventional aircraft, the US Air Force’s C-5A, was able to carry 45 tons of cargo 6,300 miles without refuelling.

      ‘A commercial version could revolutionise travel by by flying 478 passengers from New York to London for as little as £30 each!’

      Aye, the future looked bright in 1968, the same year as the Embassy Gold ad
      at 3/10 for 20. By quitting, the pack a day smoker would save the fare to New York in roughly 150 days. Today, at £10 for 20, the equivalent £1,500 saving would buy a round the world trip (I think). Out of touch with UK prices but Mungunites will know how far £1,500 will take you.

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  2. Pic 11: Good Grief! I wouldn’t have believed it, if a web-search hadn’t thrown it up (thanks to my not quite peerless Googling skills).
    It’s MI6’s prize asset, Moira, of this parish.
    Moira Anderson.
    Cue more tales of derring-do among the international jet-set.

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    1. The embodiment of grace, elegance and refinement, albeit a photograph which Moira herself detested given the circumstances in which it was taken. I continue to maintain that the court case was an unnecessary distraction to draw the public’s attention away from the looming scandal concerning Rayne Spencer and George Brown MP. Given the rural and isolated location of Moira’s estate on the Isle of Man, it was perfectly natural for her to keep a store of hand grenades and bazookas for protection. Who doesn’t? I feel it was completely understandable that Moira hurled those grenades at the Ballasalla OAPs’ lunch club’s bus misrecognising it as a Soviet tank. She had lost her opera glasses in Blackpool, after all.
      Let’s just say it was an unfortunate error and remember instead the lovely bouquet of Venus Flycatchers she had delivered to the injured in the Cottage Hospital.

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  3. Oh glory, glory! An enchantment to see picture 10 – Princess Alexandra and our own Angus Ogilvie. Of course, Moira Anderson was there, just on PA’s right hand, carrying Her Highness’s handbag and that strange artifact that Royal Ladies had to insert from the 1930s to the 1960s… But let’s park that topic there, as Dame Judi Dench says.
    Of course, we have omitted to mention the occasion of the photograph, so allow me to refresh everyone’s memory of those golden, glorious days…
    Dame Kiri Te Kanawa had flown over to Kirkintilloch for a week of intensive vocal coaching with Moira Anderson. Moira brought Dame Kiri every morning up to the Loup of Fintry waterfall where both would stand next to the Daimler carrying out a session of primal screaming. (Dame Kiri in later years ascribed her success in the operatic world to this training.)
    After screaming for around half an hour (pre-decimalisation), Moira and Dame Kiri would head to the Tartan Toorie café in Strathblane for a pot of tea and a currant scone (Dame Kiri attributes her obesity to an addiction to jam and cream begat in the tearooms of rural Stirlingshire.)
    To return to the photo, Moira and Dame Kiri returned to Moira’s Edwardian villa after a morning spent screaming and eating scones only to find Princess Alexandra and “oor ain” Angus Ogilvie ensconced in Moira’s living room gorging themselves on sweet stout and Selkirk bannock. What a pickle!
    Moiras’s quick witted response to this tricky situation was to rapidly call all the members of the Kirkintilloch Jinty and Johnny Club to an impromptu performance that very afternoon of Annie Get Your Gun in the Twechar Parish Hall. Both members of the Club agreed to attend and bring their neighbours. It was a Gala Event. Mary Marquis reported on it for the BBC and Photograph 10 shown here was buzzed across the world on the international wires. The citizens of Thimphu in Bhutan were reportedly on the verge of joyous hysteria. Understandably, given Moira’s triumphant concert in the national stadium only months earlier. A union jack flag were raised in Port Stanley in the Falkland islands when they received a morse code account of the concert and a penguin was roasted in celebration.
    I think it is a tribute to Moira’s humility and modesty that she did not try to force her way into the photo, unlike the attention-seeking camera-hogging Dame Kiri Te Kanawa whose foot can be seen bottom left in the picture. An embarrassing attempt at self-aggrandisement. Mary Marquis was appalled and Moira refuses to this day to talk of the disgusting behaviour of that operatic diva.

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    1. Your report is a half truth in regards to that photo. The chap at the bus stop I met this morning when I showed your report on my big tablet (we were socially distanced) said that Moira is not blameless as written. She removed Alexandra’s skirt belt very skillfully as she was just out of shot, she never felt a thing. Alexandra was aghast when her drawers started to move south. You can see the discomfiture in the photo.

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    2. LOL.

      I knew there was a perfectly logical explanation for all of this….somewhere, Beauregard.

      Thank you for bringing it out into the open.

      Any idea where Andy was at the time.

      PS: Munguin says that if he fonds out who roasted a penguin, they will wish they hadn’t.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I think I met that person at the bus stop, although I generally only travel my motor taxi. He had a number of vile accusations to raise against the Alexander Brothers. I paid him no heed and let him know I was well aware of his campaign to besmirch the reputations of leading cultural icons.

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        1. OMG. Fortunately, himself was taking a turn in the grounds (for inspection purposes, you understand) and missed me opening that article.

          Lord only knows otherwise he might have decided on a bit of revenge and had me roasted for dinner!

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      2. Now that you mention it Tris, Andy was in the USA with Neil Armstrong at the time, engaged in a story far too long to relate here in one go but here’s the first chapter…

        A LOT OF Andy’s time in Houston with Neil Armstrong was spent discussing Border Ballads and their role as social and cultural history. Neil had his own copy of Scott’s Ballad Minstrelsy, from which he had learned much about the exploits of his ancestral clan, but wanted to know if Scott’s work was definitive? Were there more ballads that he might have missed, particularly any that involved the Armstrongs?
        Andy was able to assure him that indeed there were, citing as an example ‘Dark Bride of Colquohoun’, an epic satire on the marriage of the heir to the chieftainship of a clan that had long been Armstrong foes. The title is a play on the bride’s name, Penny Black, a renowned beauty but of lowly status that should never have been considered an appropriate mate for a chief-to-be. A bit on the side by all means, but full marital recognition? Of course not! The union was cause for mirth throughout the Borders – and beyond – but Penny was to have the last laugh.
        What really riled the Colquohouns was that Dark Bride ballad was written not by a Borderer, not even by a Scot, but a Viennese refugee by the name of Pinkmund Freud. Pinkmund was one of a group of young European scientists investigating the causes of mental illness and generally known as ‘shrinks’ because of their theory that poor mental health could be cured by reducing the pressures on the brain caused by extended wear of the heavy spiked helmets that were so popular in the Hapsburg Empire at the time.
        Pinkmund offered to treat Mad King Ludwig of Bavaria, a proposal that was very warmly welcomed by the royal family who were fearful that the coffers would be completely drained by continued building of turret-spired mountain-top castles under the malign influence of the cunning and avaricious Italian architect, Volt de Ciné. Pinkmund recommended that the king’s head be inserted in the washing-machine twice a day at full cycle with the door open, a regimen that was to have disastrous consequences.
        Quite apart from the mess and the morning and night mopping up, Pinkmund had neglected to notice the label on the king’s neck: ‘Hant-vash only!’ and the icon with a big red X over a Bosch washing-machine (the only brand allowed in Bavaria at the time). Shrinking would not do, and Pinkmund had to flee for his life. But where ?
        The answer lay on his mother’s side, maiden name Siedlé. Her Huguenot forebears had fled to Scotland at the time of post-Reformation persecution in Bavaria, hoping to be welcomed by the strongly Calvinist and Lutheran groupings there. They were, and fell under the protection of the Armstrong clan.

        000
        That gets you started on one of Andy’s longest memoirs -and more will be revealed in due course.

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        1. I await the outcome with baited breath, John.

          There was a bright side to the story so far, though. At least the woman’s name was Penny Black. Had her family been the Dreadfuls, heaven knows how they would have coped.

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  4. The tenement photo looks like a prison.
    Who knew you could use your washing machine to make a telephone call, amazing tech back in the day! Who calls their friend or sister ‘my dear’, lol!
    Trump, looks souless, very chilling, brrrr.
    Fly be, nnnnn…I won’t show it to my son, a bit of type face nerd, the cringe sounds would be disturbing.
    12, black and white abstract art?
    No.2 looks like a painting.

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    1. No 12 is far from abstract, AH. Only too real at the moment. It’s what a virus looks like at 30,000x magnification. It’s from the same 1968 ‘Guide to Science’ book mentioned earlier (No 2) when such microscopic revelations were amazing. They enabled better understanding of viruses and how they worked – making them ‘some of the most dangerous enemies of man’ as the book put it so well 53 years ago.

      Appropriately enough, the virus shown is a respiratory disease specimen, barely a millionth of an inch thick. The magnified image shows how the virus groups in a honeycomb pattern and its identical and symmetrical 20-faceted molecular structure.

      Something new to impress your boring friends next time covid comes up in conversation (as it tends to do). Did you know that the virus shape is 20-faceted and symmetrical? You didn’t? Ah, I thought that was common knowledge among experts like you…

      Liked by 3 people

        1. Thanks to the 1968 book,I can answer that, Ed. To quote:

          //Somehow – no one knows precisely how – certain specific combinations of protein molecules and nucleic acid form a virus, the bridge between the inanimate and the animate. A virus can attack a living cell and ‘order’ it to manufacture more protein and nucleic acid molecules,which in turn can combine into virus particles.

          ;This multiplication phenomenon falls somewhere between simple chemical reaction and true reproduction.//

          The science of viruses has more than likely advanced since 1968, especially in the past year, in which case I’m sure our omniscient readership will update us

          Liked by 3 people

    2. I was thinking that mobile phones weren’t very mobile back then…still if you got your laundry done at the same time, who could complain… and it would be hard to get a sheet and duvet cover into an iphone!!

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      1. It was hard to get an actual phone in those days. They were all the huge black bakelite ones. In a backcourt like that serving about 80 flats, maybe two of those had phones. There were still calls that had to be connected by the operator. A ‘trunk call’ was calling your auntie in Edinburgh from Glasgow.

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        1. There was something, I think, called a party line where you shared the line, but not the number with some else.

          I’m told sometimes you needed to make a call but couldn’t because the other party was on the line.

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          1. I had forgotten about ‘party lines’. Yes, you sometimes had to wait until a neighbour had finished before you could make a call. Sometimes, if you picked up the receiver you could actually hear a conversation going on. We still have the the two telephone poles in our common backcourt. We modernised and refurbished it 45 years ago but BT insisted the poles remain. They still have about a dozen wires connected to them.

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            1. A pain in the posterior they were too, Tatu!

              I had a party line in Vienna in the 1980s. You could have between 1 and 3 other parties sharing the line, and that was reflected in the line rental charge. However, unlike in the UK, when one party used the line the others could NOT listen in, and their phones would go dead – a bit of a problem if your house was on fire, you were having a heart attack or an axe murderer was hacking at your front door, because with a party line in the UK you could always beg your neighbour to shut the f*uck up and get off the line to let you call 999.

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  5. OT, but I read in The National today that the SNP are to tell Boris that if there is pro-independence majority at Holyrood in May, we’re going to have a referendum whether he is minded to “allow” us to or not: https://archive.vn/RYJjE.

    Alert Munguinites may recall that a certain contributor to the good Mr. Munguin’s most excellent blog, so ably operated by Mr. Munguin’s factotum and dogsbody Tris, has been advocating this course of action for a good long while now, and believes that the Keating case was a strategic error in that regard.

    He notes that announcing that the referendum will be held, §30 or no §30, relegates the Keating to a sideshow, and whacks the ball squarely back into Westminster’s court, where it belongs. We do not and should not need to provide any justification for proceeding with an independence referendum other than the verdict of our electorate, and should not give even the appearance of coming to Westminster, cap in hand, begging for one. No, it should be entirely up to the Westminster regime to justify its antidemocratic and overweeningly arrogant behaviour – which, of course, it can’t.

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    1. Ed, I’ll give Martin Keating an opportunity to reply:

      “Now let’s say for argument that the UK Government doesn’t undermine the bill the minute it is published and wait until the SNP put the bill to the floor after the 2021 elections to challenge the bill for competency before the court. This would immediately prevent the bill from gaining royal assent until the court decision on whether the bill was lawful or not. The problem is that while the court battle is going on, there is nothing to stop the Tories at Westminster passing legislation, or modifying existing legislation to take provisions of the indyref bill out of the competence of Holyrood.”

      The English government will not do the decent thing. They are desperate to keep their claws on Scotland. Putting the ball into their court will just invite them to show where power lies in the UK.

      You know, I often think that an appeal to the monarch would be appropriate in the face of intransigence by the English government. That would reveal whether she is Queen of Scots and will defend us, or a useless institution and we would be better off as a republic.

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      1. Understood, Dave.

        Now that the Scottish Government have pre-empted the verdict in the Keating case by saying that they are going to act as directed by the people of Scotland, to whom they are answerable, regardless, the possible actions which the Westminster regime may take to prevent a referendum would be a gross infringement on our rights and a gross violation of previous commitments. The regime would face consequences if it acted in that way: international opprobrium; a Holyrood Parliament and a Scottish Government which will respond by refusing its consent to having its powers curtailed – itself in violation of the David Cameron’s written commitment in the infamous Vow – and proceeding with the referendum regardless.

        If the Westminster regime acts in such a way as to criminalize / render unlawful any action by the Scottish Government to conduct the democratic exercise which a referendum is, I’d posit that in doing so it would of its own sovereign will (sorry; couldn’t resist it) render Scotland ungovernable – ungovernable by the Westminster regime, that is. In for a penny, in for a pound, or may as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb – in throwing over Westminster’s attempt to impose its will in the matter of the referendum, the Scottish Parliament would (I predict) throw over also all the other assaults on devolution committed by this and previous Westminster Tory regimes.

        The Scottish people are in their overwhelming majority committed to having the Scottish Parliament be a permanent fixture in our political life, with the power to run as many of our internal affairs as possible. The Westminster Tory regime attempting to thwart the Scottish people’s democratic will would unite our nation in opposition to it; not forgetting that opposition to Tory regimes at Westminster has been a constant of Scottish political life since – oh, the year dot.

        The Westminster regime would be ill-advised to risk it. Any action to enforce their power over us in opposition to the popular will would be seen as the assault on our national sovereignty which it would be, and not just by our own people but internationally. We could very probably rely on our allies in Europe to impose sanctions of some kind on the regime, and put pressure on them in other ways. Our Government would have a case to put before the Trusteeship Council of the United Nations in New York – which would be a major embarrassment to the regime.

        I’m certain that no nation which has got out from under colonial-style rule in the face of opposition from the State ruling them against their will ever did so without breaking a law or two imposed by the colonizer – against the will of its people. In short, any flailing about by Westminster in its refusal to accept that the Scottish people – not the SNP, not the Scottish Government, not the Scottish Parliament, the Scottish people – have decided to end the Union.

        ¡No pasarán!

        Liked by 4 people

    2. For the sake of completeness and balance, here’s Martin Keating’s response to the SG announcement on his crowdjustice page: https://archive.vn/DYDer.

      I don’t agree with Martin’s reasoning – which I’m sure alert Munguinites will already have noticed! – and as I have said before, no nation treated as a colony, which ours would most definitely be if we were to be held against our will in this Union the same way that we were dragged out of Europe against our will – ever got out from under without breaking a law or two imposed on it against its will.

      I am convinced that the Westminster regime may huff and it may puff, but Boris and his nasty little pals are not going to stop us: they only think they can, or pretend they can, or have deluded themselves into thinking they can – but they can’t, because the more they oppose us, the more Scots – even the Proud Scots But – will reject the idea that it is Westminster’s decision to make.

      If the Claim of Right and the Vow signed by Tory Prime Minister are worth no more than the paper they were printed on, so must be all the other bits of paper which Westminster says are binding on us Scots. Ultimately, governments can govern only with the consent of the governed, and if the Westminster Tory regime truly, madly, deeply wants to make sure we will withdraw that consent, then it will try to prevent us saying whether we consent or not.

      [Trigger warning]

      Now let me see for a moment… what do you call an act of sexual intercourse performed when one of the parties cannot give or deny consent because she has first been bound and gagged? What was that word again? Begins with R … something to do with cooking oil… rapine, maybe?

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Ooft. I forgot to say something really important: I hope to hell Martin Keating wins the case he lodged – which I persist in believe was a strategic error – because winning it will put Westminster’s jaicket on an even shooglier peg.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. I remember when I visited my sister to find my nephew then 4 or 5 rather worried about Christmas. He didn’t think he would get any presents as Santa was a bit blind. They had visited the Santa at D M Browns, the Santa had the thickest of glasses which worried my nephew.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. An advert for Fruit Gums. If I had a child like that he would be put up for adoption. The voice is actually a woman, Denise Bryer the wife of Nicholas Parsons. I preferred Fruit Pastille’s, especially the blackcurrant ones.

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        1. Thought the wee boy was great, and that he was about to come out with alliteration at the end… ‘Don’t forget the £$%^&! fruit gums, Mum!’ And if birds like that could be softened up with a tube of pastilles, why did I waste so much money on boxes of Black Magic or Cadbury’s Roses? Should have spent more time watching telly and I’d have learned how to be more successful – and on the cheap.

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          1. Indeed, John. Better even than taking your date out for a meal at some swanky restaurant like Burger King.

            At one time I had a serious Rowntree’s Fruit Gums habit. Not for me those silly wee tubes of them! No, I used to go for the boxes, and consumed as many boxes of the things as I could afford. The shapes of the gums in the boxes were much more interesting than the boring round ones in the tubes, being based (loosely) around the conventionalized shape of a slice of the fruit of that flavour. Unfortunately, I had to go cold turkey on them eventually, after my third or fourth visit to the dentist in the space of a few weeks to replace fillings that had come loose from my chewing fruit gums.

            Didn’t like the pastilles: deeply unsatisfying, gone far too soon.

            Liked by 2 people

          2. “Candy is dandy
            But liquor is quicker”

            My first date was a meal consisting of:
            Hamburger in onion gravy with chips X 2
            Lime jelly with a wee daud of cream in the middle X 2
            Orange Fanta, bottle of.
            Straws X 2
            Woolworths Princes St, summer hols 1969.

            Liked by 1 person

  7. Before I got into replies, I meant to stake a small claim to No 1. The writing on the flange above the windscreen is Cyrillic but I can’t make out enough characters to make a name, far less attempt a translation. Maybe Ed has better eyesight and can take us a bit further.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Eyesight not so good, whatever Tris so kindly says. What I took for a back to front Cyrillic R is in fact the I butting up behind the S and that led me to making up more Cyrillic characters from the blurry shapes I could see. Too clever by half. If I’d looked at the placement of the steering wheel instead, that would have ruled out any Eastern European connection.

        Liked by 2 people

  8. No 13 brings back happy memories of the Fintry Grand Prix, involving ex LT AEC buses which, I think, also had pre -selector gearboxes, and were driven in the customary manic style – the turn into Arthurstone Terrace (?) outbound was always a thrilling moment in front seat, top deck. Hard also to remember what E end of Murraygate into Wellgate looked like b4 construction of the Wellgate Centre.
    There was a myth around at one time that some smoker had expired just short of some saving target so Wills had allowed widow to trade his coupons for a fine oak coffin. One of my girlfriends insisted I passed her my coupons, with which she eventually bought a Dansette. Hardly seemed worth the effort.

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      1. Alas the supply of the vaccine is in the control of Westminster. I would have preferred for the Scottish Government to be able to precure its own supply but alas it can’t. Good to see that most care home residents in Scotland have been vaccinated.

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        1. We would have been better doing it all on our own right from the start. It is particularly maddening to me when They come out with Their total crêpe that Scotland wouldn’t have been able to deal with the pandemic “on its own” because we wouldn’t have had the money so graciously given to us by the munificent English Treasury (from money borrowed on our behalf that will be added to our bill in whatever fictional amount They decide to bung into the figures to exaggerate our fictional Fiscal Black Hole They keep going on about).

          Liked by 2 people

          1. What I want to know is how Ireland, Iceland, Denmark, Luxembourg, Finland managed. Surely they must all be far too wee poor and stupid to cope without Jacob Rees Mogg showing them how it’s done.

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            1. Indeed, Tris! Without Rees-Mogg, Boris and all their pals in the regime – we here at Schloss Freeman have a particular place in our heart for Priti Patel, and I know that you are a particular fan of DOCTOR Liam Fox – why, we might establish a liberal democracy, get rid of the monarchy and aristocracy, set up our own republic, eliminate poverty and homelessness, make sure our people could always afford all the necessities of life, and guarantee access to the best educations and ensure that jobs are not just available but secure and well paid! Floreat Caledonia! To the barricades! Off with their heads (no not really, just a figure of speech, a bit of banter)!

              Which would be perfectly awful, of course: just think of the poor hedge-fund managers, bank CEOs and payday lenders! And the poor foodbanks would have to close down for lack of customers!

              And to think one of Their “arguments” against independence was that we might install a fascist regime here in Scotland, when They are so much better at it than us! Could it be that They don’t understand us? Say it ain’t so, Tris, say it ain’t so!

              Liked by 1 person

              1. I recall when DOCTOR John Reid was in govt, Telegraph and other right wing rags got very sniffy about Ph.D’s not being “real” doctors, Fox joining in to say that he never used the title when not engaged in medical work. Changed his tune a bit nowadays?

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                1. Um… yes, I seem to recall that he bit a BBC radio presenter’s head off when she called him Mr Fox. Maybe of course he was examining her athletes’ foot at the time… it was radio after all.

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              2. I’m afraid you may have to face the facts, Ed, hard though it may be for you, that the Eton set have absolutely no idea whatsoever about us jocks.

                Let it soak in then go have a lie down in a darkened room.

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                1. Oh Tris! My poor wee heart is broken! To be beneath the notice of such exalted nobs! The humiliation! However shall I bear i[Jeez! That’s quite enough from you for now. The people are all too well aware of you and your silly little ways. So simmer down and say you’re sorry-Ed.]t.

                  Sorry, Tris. I cover myself in shame again, like a cod in batter.

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                    1. I’m best served with tartare sauce (made with all organic ingredients, naturally) and seasoned with Himalayan salt, Tris, and a wedge of lemon. None of your Edinburgh runny brown sauce and malt vinegar for me, please, Tris – it would be one humiliation too far! I would never be able to hold my head up in Tesco again! I would hang my head in sham[Gawd, he’s off again. Ignore him, he’s only doing it for the attention-Ed.]e.

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                    2. I am being unfairly maligned and misrepresented! Slandered, libelled and defamed! I have nothing against broon sauce! It’s just Gordie Broon I don’t like, and Edinburgh runny broon sauce!

                      I confess to a guilty pleasure: HP Sauce. If only that stood for Holyrood Parliament, I could go to my grave content.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    3. Thanks for reminding me, Tris! As it has to come from the Netherlands, HP Sauce will be like gold dust in a month or two! I must buy in a case of the stuff now so I can do a spot of profiteering later on the back of desperate broon sauce aficionados!

                      Liked by 1 person

      2. I’m hoping that Nicola will read the reports and investigate further.

        Are any other countries taking this shortcut?

        I look forward to Ridge and Marr roasting someone from the government tomorrow over this.

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