ALL OUR YESTERDAYS

dave mach
1.
dave1
2.
shootig
3.
Image result for The Who
4.
Image result for caramac
5.
K1 No.62005
6.
jeans
7.
dinky
8.
Image result for randall and hopkirk
9.
parifin
10.
Image result for shanie wallace
11.
flashlight
12.
walls
13.
play
14.
aoy dave
15.
Image result for vintage buses
16.
Image result for norman vaughan
17.
saturday jpb
18.
dandy
19.
Image result for armadale UFP
20.

Thanks to Dave.

The same thing applies today. I won’t be around much, but I should be back in the evening. Chat among yourselves.

(My mum isn’t well and we are providing 24/7 care for her. My poor bro drew the short straw and is staying overnight.)

35 thoughts on “ALL OUR YESTERDAYS”

  1. It’s hard not to be saddened by your ‘All Our Yesterdays’ posts. Many of the people featured are no longer with us. It makes one reflect on the fragility of life to see them captured in a moment when their lives were shining so brightly.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes, of course that’s true. John.

      The places have changed too. You can’t get a lot of the stuff in the advertisements and cars and buses no longer look like they do there.

      But the idea is to look back on these things and people fondly (or not in some cases), and smile.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Pic 3 – I think, is a Morrris Traveller, in shooting brake guise. Pic 6 – Loco 62005 – an LNER Peppercorn KI, Lord of the Isles. Pic 9 (sorry, Marcia) – Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased), with Kenneth Cope, Annette Andre & (?) Pratt. Pic 17 – Norman Vaughan, erstwhile compere of Sunday Night at the London Palladium. His catchphrases were “Swinging” and “Dodgy”. He fell entirely into the latter category and was, as such, a fitting successor to Bruce Forsyth. Pic 18 – the wee fella in the shop reminds me, I don’t know why, of Jimmy Paige of Led Zeppelin.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Kangaroo, I’d have had a shot at most of them if the pic had been a bit better, so I guess you’re lucky it isn’t 🙂 I can tell you that the 2 1950s vans in the Dinky Toys pic (8) are (l to r) a Bedford 10 1/2 cwt. van and a Morris J-type Commercial. Both were really common in the streets when I was a wee fella.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. 9 -“Only you can see me Jeff – only you!”. Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased), also ITC. The original and best? The Reeves & Mortimer remake a few years ago was dire, like so many remakes are. Let sleeping dogs lie….
    Ironically, Annette Andre who played Jeannie was pencilled in for the female lead in the Champions, only to lose out to Alexandra Bastedo…

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Never heard of any of them – except the Who – but I can add a bit on the steam engine. K1 class and 2-6-0 configuration. LNER loco introduced in 1949. Several are listed as working in Scotland, particularly the West Highland line, but 62005 is not among them. That puts the location in what was the BR Eastern and North Eastern regions, “with a considerable number stationed at March”, according to my 1960 Observer Book of Railway Locomotives.

    March? Never heard of that either. The omniscient Mr Google tell me it’s a market town in Cambridgeshire, so now we know. Once again, every day’s a schoolday with MNR.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. As I used to live on Bute and worked in Glasgow hospitals, I used pic 3 frequently!! Cracking station I always thought.
    Families are important, take care.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Just across from the ticket office was (is?) a snug wee bar complete with open fire that had hardly been touched since the place was built in 1903!
      It would get pretty lively on stormy winter nights as we waited for the late running steamer to Rothesay. Steamer! showing my age there!

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Observer books hve already appeared in AOY – about half a dozen of them, on cars, birds, fish, wildlife, and other childhood interests. I thin the 1960 steam engines is probably the mpst recent.

    Going through this week’s series again, I was reminded of being struck firsttime round by the price of the jeans. Surly not $229?!? And the underlining of the 29 suggests $2.29 – which seems ridiculous at the other end of the scale. I’m sure Danny can provide enlightenment.

    I once spent the summer school holidays as a counter-hand at Lipton’s. Learning to use the bacon slicer was fun, but none of the items had price tags. I quickly had to memorise the price of everything from a can of beans to a bunch of bananas, otherwise customers would have to wait while I looked up the price of everything they were buying.

    No calculating tills either, so I had to scribble the prices on the back of a paper bag as Mrs MacLocal put the messages in her shopping bag, then tot them all up and . tell her how much was needed. She knew the price of everything to the ha’penny and would immediately demand a recount if she wasn’t happy before I could ring up the till. Good training in arithmetic, but next summer I was back to hotel portering and waitering. Nae tips for shop-hands, no matter how accurate you were with sums and bacon slicing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Crivens… they let you loose on the bacon slicer?

      Yes, we have enjoyed the Observer Books before, John. Before Google they were what people used to look up what was what!

      I think jeans were very cheap in America. Still are, compared to the ridiculous price they are here.

      Like

  7. As a teenager, had a pair of shoes the same colour as Caramac – and a short lived taste for Caramac itself. Overwhelmingly sweet which I suppose meant that you couldn’t eat too much of it.

    I have always been a bit amazed at how guys like Norman Vaughan could get rapturous mirth and applause by repeating simple catchphrases – and how quickly they might pass into use – hockey teammates would praise a « swinging » pass – and then be as rapidly forgotten.

    Always thought the LNER K’s were Thomson’s but always open to correction.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Like Bruce Forsyth, he seemed to have virtually no talent at all… or maybe it’s all a question of taste becasue they were both very successful.

      I remember someone saying that Bruce Forsyth was the British Sammy Davis.

      Jeeez, yes, but without any of the talent, I thought.

      Like

  8. Ahhhhh Caramac. I could eat any amount of Caramac, it was lovely.
    Sadly, one of the reasons I find myself with Type 2 diabetes in later life.

    Liked by 1 person

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