JEREMY: I SUPPORT EVERY TEAM

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Jeremy Hunt is afraid that if he says he supports one team above another, he might lose a vote or two.

So, as long as they play by the rules, of course.

He must be a mixture of elated and disappointed every week.

I think either Bojo of Hunt will be a disaster. Boris is a clown and with him as PM we shall be subjected to daily embarrassments of Trump-style errors of judgement.

But Hunt… What can you say? 

Image result for jeremy hunt looking particularly greasy

Up till now, he has had almost nothing to do with Scotland. As Culture Secretary his remit was largely English and as English Health Secretary, he, very, fortunately, had no influence on our health service. But if he becomes prime minister… 

Oh dear, the thought is too much to bear.

I actually find myself actually physically repelled by him.

Which of the two would Munguinites prefer?

 

47 thoughts on “JEREMY: I SUPPORT EVERY TEAM”

  1. The whole sorry Brexit saga is redolent of the outbreak of WWI, a war which nobody wanted, brought about by a heedless political class not acting in the best interests of their countries.

    We have political parties mired in indecision and internal strife, and a polity divided over the issue, with at least suspected Russian dirty money going into political parties openly (and other groups covertly) whose aim it is to weaken Europe up to the boundaries of Russia itself so it can snatch more of its old empire back. BoJo and the Tories are implicated – and so is Farage, and of course Farage’s pal Trump.

    Liked by 5 people

  2. On a scale of 1-10 of sociopathy* then :

    Boris = 10+

    Jeremy = 6-7

    IMHO all politicians eventually develop sociopathic traits but Boris’ “Housemaster” at Eton in 1982 seems to have identified it in him back then.

    My personal choice would be Hunt because nobody will follow him to war. Boris is a different matter because he’s loonytunes and always has been, just like 20%+ of the average English constituency.

    For indyref2 – we have enough support before any campaign starts regardless of which idiot becomes PM.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. I note that the “Top no-deal” civil servant has quit.

    This would be the same 33 year old, privately schooled, never worked for anything other than right-wing QUANGOs in his life would it?

    When the going gets tough…..

    Then again if its a million to one chance it just might work – none of this one of this fiddly “995,351 to 1” business* though…. sort of sums up Boris really….

    *hat-tip to Terry Pratchett

    Like

  4. I note that the “Top no-deal” civil servant has quit.

    This would be the same 33 year old, privately schooled, never worked for anything other than right-wing QUANGOs in his life would it?

    When the going gets tough…..

    Then again if its a million to one chance it just might work – none of this one of this fiddly “995,351 to 1” business* though…. sort of sums up Boris really….

    *hat-tip to Terry Pratchett

    Liked by 1 person

  5. At least with BoJo he is open with his crazy nastiness.
    Hunt strikes me as the archetypal Westminsterite.
    Secrecy,stealth,deceit and lies but the end result being just as nasty.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. If I knew what the heck you were talking about I’d give you an up vote!

        Och, it sounded bad enough I’ve given you an up vote anyway!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. When Hunt fails to deliver Brexit the headbangers will all complain that a Remainer was in charge. When Johnson fails perhaps the penny will start to drop among the voting population. More Remain positives come from Johnson’s Brexit failure than Hunt’s so I’m Team Boris for now.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. For that reason (that he’s a remainer), I think Boris will probably win, given the constituency… ie, largely elderly Tories, predominantly resident in the southern counties.

      Like

  7. Not sure Hunt mentioning football was a good idea given the electorate he’s aiming at. Shouldn’t he have said, “I play golf. Badly.”? That signals he’s no oik but a sterling chap with a decent streak of humility.

    “Good man to have in your corner when the Hun’s launching an assault. I remember when Johnny Turk had the Anzac fellows pinned down at Gallipoli. Before you could say ‘Widdecombe’ there was Hunt Minor with his number 3 iron shouting ‘Just wait till I get my hands on your Special Savings Accounts, Abdul. I’ll blow your high earning differentials to kingdom come.’. Absolute idiot but brought a smile to an old campaigner’s face.”

    Liked by 3 people

  8. Both of them seem equally capable of leading the Conservative & Unionist Party. Neither of them are remotely capable of being prime minister. Johnson is a narcissist and dilettante; Hunt is a spiv.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. “When I am in desperate straits in the common man game I pretend. Really, I prefer Polo. I do not necessarily support a particular team, as long as they abide by the rules” would have been perhaps a more honest answer? Not your average guy on the terraces, oor Jeremy.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. There is probably an “Alice through the looking glass” idea that we are now experiencing is anything like a democracy.

    A PM resigns as she can’t get her way. She sniffs and cries and expresses love of country.

    Her party demands a replacement from her party.

    Eh!

    The boys in blue just lost their leader. Well, quite right! From within their numbers they will find another leader.

    That makes a lot of sense, they have shown that they cannot govern and are therefor the most obvious folk to find another leader. Q E f’ing D.

    And after a lot of faffing around, their hero Boris rises to the surface.

    Shortly thereafter 170,000 geriatric Conservatives from the SE of England elect him as our new leader. (I too, am geriatric, but from further North.)

    And so The Conservative and Unionist Party drives us forward without genuine consultation. And that is as it should be, for who are we?

    We are just the electorate. Only consulted when necessary, and this, most certainly, isn’t the moment.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Let me put that another way, Douglas: “now is not the time”.

      I seem to recall a time when Blair, T of the Reds was stepping down as Head Boy and Brown, G was being touted as his replacement. It was at that time that a certain Johnson, B (aka Johnson Major, already identified as a sociopath by his Housemaster) opined that Brown, G would not legitimately be Head Boy as the usual electionem generalem plebium had not been held. But now that the Blue team is holding the reins, in a temporary alliance with the Orange team, here we have Johnson Major running for Head Boy himself now the May, T is stepping down – it’s spooky, isn’t it, the similarity between her and Mad-Eye Tony, isn’t it?

      Still, we were already aware that Johnson Major is illegitimate, i.e., that he’s a b*astard, not so much anything to do with his parent’s marital status. But boy, some mothers do ‘ave ’em, eh?

      Liked by 4 people

        1. Thank you, Douglas! I am hereby shamelessly nicking “Q E effin’ D”.

          I think I already said, re Boris rising to the surface, that this an example of recrudescence, a word which means the crud is rising to the top of the cesspit again…

          Liked by 2 people

          1. One of my brothers had, as his thesis, Three states of solids in sewage trearment; suspension, precipitation and floatation. He doesn’t speak of it now but I cannot help see its relevance. It even ceases to be allegorical when looking at Westminster.

            Liked by 3 people

      1. eddjasfreeman,

        “I seem to recall a time when Blair, T of the Reds was stepping down as Head Boy and Brown, G was being touted as his replacement. It was at that time that a certain Johnson, B (aka Johnson Major, already identified as a sociopath by his Housemaster) opined that Brown, G would not legitimately be Head Boy as the usual electionem generalem plebium had not been held. But now that the Blue team is holding the reins, in a temporary alliance with the Orange team, here we have Johnson Major running for Head Boy himself now the May, T is stepping down – it’s spooky, isn’t it, the similarity between her and Mad-Eye Tony, isn’t it?”

        Well, yes. This is how shit Westminster is? It was ridiculous that Brown became Prime Minister without being elected. I would argue that should one PM fall, then we are due a General Election. Like right now.

        It’ll never happen. We are not a democracy.

        I could play you a tune, but you know it already.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Oh! And by the way, I really feel at home here. This is argueably my ‘safe space’.

          Trispw excuses my occasional lack of decorum, (ahem), and there is more intelligent comment on here than anywhere else.

          Just to be emotional. My screensaver is a galaxy, far, far away.

          It was a gift that I didn’t know was possible to give.

          A guy called Danny gave me that.

          That, dear reader, is, as they say ‘interesting’.

          Love you lots.

          Liked by 2 people

  11. If I can also get in on the group hug, this is a very special space, it is a sort of safe space.
    An example;
    Before this thread I was bobbing up and down on my chair as my arse cheeks clenched and eased in spasms of indignation and anger. Now at this point I have been given the chance to admire the turn of phrase and thoughts of others, smile and chortle. My head is calm, as is my sitting posture, all good for cardiac and upholstery.
    Love you all,
    Om om om

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Echo all of the above comments. I think it was Terry earlier on who said matters might improve, and the English come to their senses. Well I am still stuck with six people whom up until the question of Scottish Independence and Brexit occurred, seemed, over the forty years I have been related to them, reasonable well balanced persons.
    No longer. Their outright hatred of foreigners, not just immigrants, is palpable, and as for us daring to leave a union with the most loving, caring, nation on the planet, well, how could we ever consider that course of action.
    If this snapshot is typical of English opinion, and we choose to stay in this unequal partnership, then we really are doomed.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Yep. That seems like the Poms I know. They are really taking it badly that we could actually want to leave them and that we’re not eternally grateful for their outrageous generosity.
      Boak!

      Liked by 2 people

    2. To be fair I’m not sure that this rabid hatred of foreigners is typically English… and I’ve seen it here, in Scotland, and for that matter in France where I used to live.

      Not quite to the extent that it’s been evident recently in the UK, but it exists… everywhere it seems.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It is unfortunately true that racism / xenophobia exists everywhere – but European cultures seem to be particularly afflicted by it (though my historical and other knowledge is hardly encyclopaedic).

        In the UK we have four countries, and rather more cultures than that. However, in Kenya, say, there are 47 tribes with a good 47 languages between them (the counting is not quite that simple, unfortunately), so people generally have a lot more exposure to different cultures and languages than we Scots do. The majority group – the Kikuyu (Gikuyu) do have a tendency to want to throw their weight around; politics could hardly be more corrupt there, and democracy is a bit of a joke, but still… it is generally accepted that different people from different backgrounds are going to be a bit different, and no harm in it.

        On the traditional cultural level, there are some simmering enmities which persist, not all of them based on economics. There is, for example, the age-old clash of interests between (semi)nomadic pastoralists and settled agriculturalists, in which the European concept of ownership of land plays a noxious part. We’re familiar in Scotland with the concept of Border reivers – that sort of thing goes on too, with the usual cattle-rustling, which can be viewed as the taking of plunder.

        I have a theory, and it is my own, that traditions of hospitality and the etiquette of guesting and hosting play a significant part in conflict avoidance, mitigation and resolution. From our own history, we can point to the Glencoe massacre as a particularly egregious act because the laws of hospitality, which dictated that any hostilities should be suspended when guesting under someone else’s roof, were broken.

        When I lived in Kenya and Tanzania no one directed anything that could be construed as racism against me – with one exception, and that was a guy getting pissed in a dark corner of a bar busy hating everyone including himself. Anyway, I sent him over a bottle of the same beer he was drinking, and that solved that one.

        Really, I found that there was effectively no racism directed against us wazungu – except we would be expected to pay about double in the market compared to what (other) locals / other black Africans had to pay. That is, we were expected to have more money that your average African, and were considered tourists, not because we were hated under a veneer of politeness. Tourists are charged more than residents of Kenya to get into the national parks, for example; it’s a strategy, not an aberration (I managed to get the local rate).

        As far as I could tell, any racism going about came from the wazungu. I came to feel that it is the original sin of our European cultures – as Americans are wont to say that slavery was the original sin of their country, and we have the infamous example of apartheid to consider too. What is it about suffering from a genetic mutation which stops our melanocytes working properly that makes us whities so special – and frequently obnoxious toward those with darker skin? People are people are people.

        Tourists and incomers who have those obnoxious (colonialist) attitudes and behave badly – doing a lot of shouting, as if that would make any difference to the situation, and insulting people and complaining constantly – do of course exist. They are frequently lampooned on Kenyan TV comedy shows. We all know the type, don’t we? We hate it when Little Englanders direct it at us Jockanese… behave like that and you can expect pushback, but the pushback isn’t racism, it’s a perfectly normal human reaction toward members of our species who are behaving badly.

        Returning to the habit of charging wazungu double the normal price, this can be considered an intersection of personal interest and patriotism: tourists / foreigners bring money into the country and boost the national economy, so it’s your patriotic duty to relieve them of as much of it as possible – for no one can say that the local economies of East Africa don’t need as much help as they can get.

        Liked by 4 people

  13. Asking who would you prefer between
    The two Brexity chancers is akin
    To asking which poison do you
    Prefer to drink .

    Err ! Neither

    Eddy

    Not so much a comment more
    A novelette. 🤐

    Liked by 3 people

    1. But an interesting novelette. I am pretty sure that that word “wazungu” rarely appears in your average Glaswegians vocabulary. But, I know that word.

      It means ‘white’ in some African language(s).

      I think I learnt that from a Dumfries food charity manager.

      Strange, the roundabouts of life.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. “Novelette”. Hm. Douglas, I shall take that as a compliment, though for some reason the word conjured up a memory of Georgette Heyer.

        The word “wazungu” (sing. mzungu) in Swahili has a meaning that is actually a bit more complex than just a white-skinned person. Its roots (I was told) mean someone who is lost, both physically and figuratively; Chinese people are covered by it too, though brown-skinned persons from the subcontinent tend not to be – because of the long history of their presence, they generally speak Swahili in addition to everything else. Broad brush: the Indian (yet another pretty ignorant wazungu word) experience in East Africa was originally as traders and shopkeepers.

        The first – physically lost – meaning of “mzungu” possibly dates back to the first European explorers, who could tell your their latitude and longitude, probably, but did not know the land; the second meaning relates to the whole European experience in Africa and the locals’ experience of Europeans: socially lost as well, forever going around shouting incomprehensibly at everybody and treating persons of importance and high social standing as coolies and idiots, unforgivably rude…

        Then there was the Europeans’ damnable habit of going around discovering things. As if the locals had somehow been unaware of the existence of, say, Victoria Falls! What kind of chutzpah or hubris does it take to call a whole vast chunk of Africa “Rhodesia”? And no one much bothered to learn any of their languages, and weren’t interested anyway in what the locals might call such places – and tended to get it wrong anyway.

        As for the roundabouts, the swings are pretty horrific too. IMHO.

        There. Another novelina.

        Liked by 2 people

    2. Nicola put it well when she replied “Thats like asking if you prefer to get run over by a truck or a bus”!after being asked which candidate she preferred.

      Liked by 3 people

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