44 thoughts on “ALL OUR YESTERDAYS”

  1. The houses with the passing cyclist are Orlit flat roof houses, from late 40’s/ early 50’s and horribly prone to damp. I suffered from recurring bronchitis when I lived in one in my youth and haven’t done since moving away despite being a smoker for 30 years afterwards till the mid 8o’s. The real indicator for me was that the sleeves of LP’s in my bedroom lost their lamination over time, despite parental insistence that no heating was required in a bedroom. The houses have long since been refurbished.

    One picture is the Canongate in Edinburgh clock still there – and is that the Dundee Gaumont ? Am stumped by the Ford with greyhound – in fact what one can see of the radiator grille looks to have more of a Riley shape. Await enlightenment with bated breath.

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    1. DAAAAAAAVE>>>>>>

      Ive never understood why they built flat roof houses in a country as rainy as Scotland.

      Don’t think it’s the Dundee one… From memory the building is a bit too ornate.

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      1. I think that the houses in pic 6 are somewhere in Edinburgh. My aunt and uncle used to live in Drylaw in Edinburgh and the houses in the photo look just like those in Easter Drylaw Gardens – for example, the overall size and the window and door layout – except that the Drylaw houses have conventional roofs. Be interested to know where the flat roofed versions are (and if they are still flat roofed today).

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        1. They were banned in the early 70s, I think; the same legislation removed the requirement for a front number plate on motorbikes for the same reason.

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          1. It isn’t actually illegal to have a bonnet/hood mascot or ornament in the U.K. Rolls Royce and Mercedes still fit them, although they are spring-loaded and collapse in the event of impact. You still see many Jaguars retro-fitted with the leaping jaguar mascot although it’s many years since Jaguar produced cars with them. You can be held liable in law, however, if any hood ornament causes injury or harm to any pedestrian. Interestingly enough, just 2 days ago, I saw a Jaguar with a very large hood ornament, not of the big cat but of a stag with a fine set of antlers. I imagine that would do a fair amount of damage to any pedestrian it came in contact with.

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  2. A guess at the book in pic 3 (and maybe 4, if it’s the same book).

    It looks like the title could be “Secession Testimony” and, if so, it could be something to do with the secessions from the Church of Scotland in 1733 and 1761 which ultimately led to the formation of the United Presbyterian Church of Scotland (which subsequently re-merged with the Church of Scotland in 1929, making you wonder what the point of the secession was in the first place!?)

    Or then again, I could be over-thinking this and it could be about the secession of the American colonies in 1776 – – –

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    1. There is a book called “The present truth: a display of the secession-testimony; in the three periods of the rise, state, and maintenance of that testimony.” by Adam Gib.
      The name may be a connection to the inscription, an ancestor perhaps.

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      1. Conan, you are aptly named. That is indeed the book. The other side of the flyleaf has a signature Henry Gibb (double b), compounding the possible family connection.

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  3. Yes it’s an Austin Seven with a Swallow Sidecar body, a mark ONE Jaguar, as I like to say to big Jag owners.
    Pre war they used Jaguar SS, as you say the SS designation was dropped around the late 30’s, 1937 or so.
    Mr Lyons built flash bodies on Austin and Standard chassis and pimped them up a bit, nothing really new. A ladies compact was in the glovebox, nice picture of a swallow, collector’s item now.
    Made a nice little 2 seat open version as well.

    Liked by 1 person

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