57 thoughts on “ALL OUR YESTERDAYS”

  1. 3rd pic, the incomparable Vincent Black shadow 1,000cc – not for the nervous. 5th pic Glesca, corner of Hope St & Sauchiehall Street (1930s? – anyway before my time). 6th pic – Enbra, Princes St., probably late 50s-early 60s, going by the clothes, tram & Lambretta scooter. I note the tailors, Hector Powe – as we used to say, back in the day of H.P., about Powe’s & John Collier (& others) – “Wear it today, forget to pay” and “£2 down and a change of address”. Those of you around then will know what I mean. The first photo is intriguing. It’s just a man and a woman – or, Un homme et une femme – but it’s surely Paris – who could they be?

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    1. I think Tris is trying to fool us with the Parisian photie. At first glance it look fifties but… look at the cars – 1980?

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      1. Well spotted, Conan – it’s Saint Germain des Prés, 1980, by the photographer Peter Turnley. Personally, I think it looks staged, just like a scene from one of the French classic 50s/60s films, no doubt deliberately. I think I prefer Brassai.

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          1. Well, I know the work of Brassai, Doisneaux, Cartier-Bresson, Atget, but I hadn’t heard of Bollards – was he a smaller pillar of the French photographic community?

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      1. That first one – Peter Turnley, yes, as people have said. I’m going to take advantage of a couple of the peculiarities of French grammar and give it a caption – ahem: “En attendant son petit ami”.

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  2. A couple of easy ones for me: Vincent Black Shadow (especially as I think you covered it before 🙂 ) and the corner of Hanover St and Princes St circa 1955.

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    1. Yes, the Edinburgh pic can’t be much later than 1955 as the trams stopped running in late 1956. I have (very vague) memories of Edinburgh trams – I was only 3½ when they stopped, but my grandparents lived at Pilrig in Leith Walk, not far from the Shrubhill tram depot. I like the way that the building behind the tram is almost black, which is how I remember Edinburgh as a child, as opposed to the same corner’s current (cleaner?) sandstone colour.

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        1. Auld Reekie. It was a hundred and fifty years of coal fires. Have a look at the Scott Monument; they tried to clean it up but bits started falling off it, so it was stopped halfway through.

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            1. Interesting, Conan – I’d wondered about the Monument’s patchwork appearance but I didn’t know that they’d had to abandon the cleaning. And, looking it up, I see that, although they used stone from the original quarry for restoration and repairs, this stone has never been (and presumably never will be) soot-darkened, so the patchwork look is here to stay!

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              1. I could bore for hours on the subject Gordon. I worked for Community Safety for a while and removing graffiti from the crumbling stonework of World Heritage sites in Edinburgh became my specialized subject. My colleague got the more fun job prosecuting the perpetrators.

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      1. It’s a No.23 exiting Hanover St. before going up The Mound – the service ran from Granton Rd. Station to Morningside Station.

        Also fr0m Gr. Rd St.was the No 27 which followed the same route as far as the Kings Theatre where it turned into Gilmore place and on to its terminus at Firhill..

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  3. Love the Rinso ad! When I was wee – a long time ago – I remember seeing all the ads on my grannie’s TV (we didnae huv ane). There seemed to be “hunners” of ads for soap powders – Daz, Rinso, Surf, Dreft, Persil, etc. – and they were all “new” & “improved”. Everything was “new” & “improved” and there always seemed to be some bloke in a white coat to convince the viewer that it was “scientifically proven”. Them wuz the days!

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    1. When you think of all the time that it was “new and improved”, you can help thinking how utterly crap it must have been at the beginning…

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  4. Pic 1 , the old ball and chain ? Pic 2 spangles , sqaure boiled sweets with a slight dent in the middle lovely they were . Pic 4 radiation in a box , pic 5 Glasgow Hope St and either West George St or Sauchiehall St , last one Rinso by Lever Brothers or Unilever as we know it , but nobody knows what the hell solium was , Surrender Dorothy was a special effect in the Wizard of Oz when the witch rides on her broom across the sky writing Surrender Dorothy .

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    1. Solium, in Latin, can mean Bath-tub, so maybe some advertising “creative” thought it’d be a good word for a washing-powder ingredient. It sounds scientific, so modern, and classical, so trusted, at the same time. On the other hand, maybe Rinso’s boffins discovered a hitherto unknown chemical element ideal for making soap powder. Chemical formula = Ha2, Ho2, He2.

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      1. You know there was also a song to go with Rinso actually there were two songs , one for Rinso white and the other for Rinso blue .
        All together now in a nice cheerful 50’s/60’s posh voice , remember smile ………………
        ” The soap we’ve made for your delight ”
        “It washes whiter and brighter than new ”
        ” And saves you barrels of money too”
        ” Its extra rich and extra kind ”
        ” And it leaves old Rinso far behind “

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          1. Bring back Danny Baker and Shane Ritchie with the door step challenge , all is mostly forgiven …
            What is going on in Turkey , bizarre .

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      1. They were individually wrapped, the dent meant the paper only stuck at the sides easier to open. The Spangles that came in army ration packs in the seventies were plain white if I remember correctly.

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        1. Conan, I didn’t realise that why the dent was there. I thought it was somebody’s job in the Spangles factory to squeeze each one between thumb and finger to see if they were solidifying properly.

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        1. Ah… but I wasn’t…

          Remember all the Greek classical references Niko comes up with.

          We all know he’s really bright under that stubborn exterior.

          I meant it was me that was stupid. Well, Munguin says so.

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  5. Yes, my Mum used to use Rinso, but I don’t recall her going around with the packet stuck to the side of her face like that. But I also remember that she had a ‘cheese’ grater which she kept specifically for the grating of household soap (yellow or green), Sunlight I think was one, into the new-fangled washing machine. I suppose that was a throw back to the days prior to soap powder, and she never quite lost the habit. Probably a lot more environmentally friendly, too.

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      1. I remember the mums competition for the who’s whites were the whitest hanging out in the drying green awards back in the 60s. The competitors being my mum and our women neighbours. This all took place while the men were off doing proper work of course and they would come in on some pretext or other and end up sitting for a while as the coffee came out. We only got tea but visitors got coffee because it was sophisticated and cosmopolitan.

        You couldn’t say where I was brought up was a feminist stronghold but it was what it was and as long as the men thought they were in charge and did what they were telt, peace ensued.

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        1. LOL. I think it was often thus.

          Coffee used to be REALLY expensive by comparison with tea.

          I can vaguely remember my mum buy an old lady a jar of coffee, because she knew she liked it, but on her pathetic pension couldn’t afford it..

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