SO HOW ARE WE DOING?

 

Just to cheer you up…

££
Well, unemployment is down. ..
£
…and growth is up…
£££
…and we seem to be doing better with wages…
££££
And foreign direct investment is ahead of the other two Celtic countries and all the regions of England with the exception of the London powerhouse.

 

It’s not all peaches and cream, and we’re not claiming all the credit for the Scottish parliament and government (before you start, Niko!).

Economic levers are massively (or bigly as Trump would say) in the hands of London so unemployment, for example, may be affected by decisions taken in London as well as Edinburgh. But there has also been good news for NHS Scotland with our waiting times lower than the other three countries and our university students are the most likely to be employed.

The Ernst and Young survey is largely positive but it warns that once the uncertainty surrounding Brexit takes hold, we could be in for a bumpy ride. As I said, decisions taken in London can affect our economic outlook.

BREAKING: performance now moved ahead of Improvement Plan target. PPM 93.7% (4% ahead of Eng/Wales) well done to railway workers!

And yes, even the trains are more likely to be on time here than anywhere else.

23 thoughts on “SO HOW ARE WE DOING?”

  1. How do we get information like this into the skulls of those who have been brought up to believe that if it’s Scottish it must automatically be worse than in England? They suffer from a delusion, aka “The Cringe”, and it’s one that is significantly aggravated by ESSEMPEEBAD, a nasty ideology with its own cult following, one that tries to inculcate dangerous and negative values in its brainwashed subjects, causing significant psychological damage while they’re at it. A bit like the devotees of thuggee, really, minus the bloodshed and the garrotings. [That’s going a bit far, don’t you think? Mundell’s far too fluffy to be a credible thug. What? Oh, the Honorary Colonel? I take your point. – Ed.]

    On the other hand, I generally can’t be bothered trying anyway, as I prefer banging my head off brick walls – ignorance is curable, but in my experience, wilful pig-ignorance is both chronic and incurable (in my experience of other people, natch). If you’re suffering from disordered thought processes, you don’t recover without some degree of insight into your problem – and insight is something our Usual Suspects simply ain’t got.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. LOL. True, and we must remember that many people don;t get their politics from anything other than the BBC and the Daily Express or Mail.

      You’re simply not likely to get many Scotland good stories in there.

      Some one said the other day that they simply didn;t believe that Scotland could make it on its own. I think that Stuart did an article about it.

      Malta with the population of Edinburgh and no real natural resources can manage. Iceland with the population of Edinburgh can manage. Ireland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Luxembourg…
      Have none of these people heard of these countries, or do they think that the average Scot is infinitely stupider than the average small country European?

      Really, I know we have some real numb nuts here, but doesn’t Denmark? Doesn’t Ireland, and is everyone in Malt just a genius?

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Well, I once had an unbelievably [censored] and [censored] relationship – rather short, alas – with a very [censored] Maltese indeed with an [censored censored censored] and [censored censored], who was a bit dim but EXTREMELY [censored censored censored] in the you-know-where. However, I have to say that although I liked the żebbuġ mimli rather a lot, I wasn’t keen at all on the bebbux, and as for the stuffat tal-qarnit, you can keep it.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. P.S. The inability of your average brainwashed Yoon to take on board the fact that Malta is both a lot smaller than Scotland and with a population only about a tenth as great, if that, but has more say over the terms of Brexit than we Scots do – that’s exactly what I meant by the wilful pig-ignorance coupled with lack of insight into their own deluded and disordered thought patterns.

          P.P.S. No unacceptable and discriminatory stereotyping going on there. Oh no. Not in a month of blue moons on Sundays. Heaven forfend!

          Liked by 1 person

          1. But it’s true. Our say on Brexit in the end will be determined largely by Fluffy’s input into cabinet, which is almost certainly negligible… and possibly the votes of the UK parliament in which we have fewer than a tenth of the who;e.

            Malta will have the force of its government…one of the 27.

            Liked by 1 person

        2. All that Maltese food, and you didn’t mention the sweetie with a roughly spherical malt honeycomb centre, surrounded by milk chocolate?

          Liked by 2 people

          1. Oooohhhhh… you had to mention those, Conan… I must never be left alone with sweeties of any kind, because I AM NOT ALLOWED THEM but at the same time I CANNOT RESIST THEM.

            Like

  2. Notice that Labour so-called “researchers” have revived the canard about passengers in 1895 travelling from Edinburgh to Dundee in 59 minutes. This timing was indeed achieved on the last night of the railway races during East and West coast companies raced their 7pm sleeper expresses from their respective London termini to Aberdeen. Crews were given carte blanche to ignore normal speed limits and some spectacular running took place on both routes.

    On the last night, the east coast sleeper service came through the Portobello curves so fast that some passengers were thrown from their berths and some I believe suffered injury. The sleepers went no further than Edinburgh and three 4 wheel coaches were taken on to Dundee in 59 minutes. There was already growing public concern about the risks being run, and amid threats of government intervention, the companies restored sanity and normal timetables thereafter. ( I am not even sure the Dundee section had passengers since transferring shaken sleeping car passengers to 4 wheel coaches at 2 am hardly seems practicable, nor would such a transfer appeal to the purchaser of a 1st class sleeping berth from London.)

    I see the new Tory MP is accusing the SNP of failing to reduce travel times to Aberdeen. With 2 speed limited bridges, a tunnel with a kink in the middle at Kinghorn, severe curvature on Fife coast and a big chunk of single track near Montrose, the present timings are unlikely ever to improve by more than a minute or two. Aberdonians Tories may have to live with disappointment if their party ever achieves power at Holyrood.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Interesting story there.

      I suppose that, if Scotland had access to the kind of money the English are going to spend on their high-speed trains, we might be able to achieve a speeding up of traffic.

      I understand that the journey on a bus from Dundee to Edinburgh will soon be faster than the train, and much cheaper, with the opening of the new bridge and dedicated bus lanes all the way from Dunfermline to the capital.

      I’ll settle for the trains running on time, in as much as that is possible. And Scotrail is, as I understand it, the best train company in the UK for that.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Given the topography of Fife and the east coast generally , I suspect that the cost of a high speed line would be, mile for mile, higher than HS2. The best route, at least from the west, would be the old Caledonian route through Strathmore but that would miss out Dundee.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Actually, I’m not really suggesting that we have one. Some decent rails would be nice, but we don’t REALLY need high speed trains here.

          I wouldn’t mind so much paying for the one in England if it was on the East or West coast lines, but it’s not. It’s going to Birmingham, Leeds and Manchester.

          The economic effect on Scotland will probably be negative, and if you add that to the negative effect that Brexit will have on our economy, I think we are getting a bad deal here.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. Please feel free to correct me if I’m wrong, but I did read a while ago that once HS2 is completed, then there would be no Inter-City trains travelling further North than either Edinburgh or Glasgow. And wasn’t there a suggestion, that say if you were travelling South, and wanted to change to HS2 at Birmingham, you had to travel across the city to a different station?
    And I’m assuming that we, the Scottish taxpayers, will have to contribute to this project even although, if I’m correct, it will give a less efficient service than we have at the moment.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. If there are to be no Intercity trains north of the central belt, is that why Abelllo are acquiring refurbished 125’s ?

      The 125’s are 40 years old but still better than sprinters etc !

      Liked by 2 people

    2. I’m not sure Alex. I remember at one time there was a proposal to use electric trains from London to Edinburgh, but not to upgrade the lines between the capital and Aberdeen. So this would have meant London to Aberdeen would have entailed a change at Edinburgh.

      I can’t imagine why anyone would want to break the journey to London by travelling across the city to get into a train that will shave 20 minutes off the journey and cost a fortune.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh well, that’s nice.

        I’ll l;ook forward to missing a connection in Edinburgh becasue the train is late.

        Actually, the last time I took an intercity from London, I’d come back from Paris. I got on the Aberdeen train, and somewhere in the North of England something had happened to the rails or a bridge or something, and there was a 2 hour delay.

        It was a nightmare. The train was overcrowded, they ran out of stuff in the buffet. No one knew what was happening.

        I’ve had far better service in third world countries.

        Until we get thrown out of Open Skies, I will fly to Paris… then… I suppose I’ll be stuck here.

        Like

      1. Fair enough.

        Athough in most countries in Europe (specially France), it was about speeding up communications. I’ve been on TGV so many times, and it’s miles better than a flight.

        Same with the train between Paris and London.

        I’d certainly not transfer at Birmingham if I were taking the train to London (although I’d be inclined to fly to London rather than take the train.)

        I just always wonder how the rest of Europe can run fast efficient trains at about half the cost of the British ones.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Most countries seem to be able to run things faster and more efficient than Britain.

    Its yet another reason to disband it because it contaminates anything unfortunate or foolish enough to stay trapped within it.

    It would take us time to heal once we got out but I’m sure we would be super fast and efficient in that process.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hear hear.

      There is a yoon idea that Scotland could never run a successful country if it was on its own… ya know, like Ireland or Denmark or Norway.

      I think that it’s Britain that can;t run a proper country. What a bloody mess everything gets in while we punch above our weight.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. The purpose of HS2 is not to boost the economies of Birmingham and Manchester but to ensure that London continues to have access to the resources it requires.
    England being reduced to a single city state,a bit like Rome in times gone by and Scotland,well….who cares.

    Liked by 2 people

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