What did Côte d’Ivoire ever do to you?

This is the Irish flag:

a1

This is the flag of the Ivory Coast (Côte d’Ivoire)

1

And this is, apparently, the bonfire Arlene’s lads have built:

aivory coast

So, what have the Billy Cans, I mean Boys, got against Côte d’Ivoire?

Anyone know?

 

Advertisements

38 thoughts on “What did Côte d’Ivoire ever do to you?”

  1. Can’t understand it, Tris. I’d have thought guys from Côte d’Ivoire might have been members of the Black Chapter too. No, I’ve worked it out – Arlene’s boys are all kinda backward so they see the flag backward too. I do hope nobody lights that bonfire while that loyal chap is on top of it.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I’ve only now figured it out – the guy with the flag has just claimed Doonbeg as a colony of Côte d’Ivoire. Or maybe they’re celebrating a twinning ceremony between Doonbeg and Abidjan.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The possibilities are endless with the cave dwellers, Andi.

      They probably think though, that Ivory Coast should be a colony of Doonbeg. Great Britishness and all that!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. It is that French way they write their name surely.. Reekin of catholic..
    Architect students will know this as the ‘pallet broch’..
    The real reason it hangs on the pole this way is ‘they’ cannot touch green!
    Unless of course it was for Arlene’s cash for ash sche..
    .. Hey a minute..!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Aye, we probably paid for all that ash, and Arlene’s just picked up another billion and brought it home on her free £20,000 flight!! So plenty more where that came from.

      I prefer a good Scottish broch!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Fascinating places brochs. Archaeologists have argued for years about just who built them and why. That nothing could actually originate in Scotland was a given to Victorians, so in their view they were built by dispossessed Southern (therefore more *civilized*) tribes.
        That they were used as watchtowers and strongpoints is undeniable but was it from Irish pirates or Roman slave traders? Or both? Perhaps the next clan along? We’ll never really know, but speculation is fun.

        Liked by 2 people

  4. Wait, are they really going to light that? In a residential area?

    Better have the fire brigade on speed-dial, or better yet – already present.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Their firemen will probably be getting a pay rise, thanks to Tessy’s generosity…or desperation (whichever way you look at it).

      Hard to imagine that they are allowed to burn that so close to people’s houses.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. In any other part of the UK, that bonfire would be a sectarian hate crime. Can you imagine white folk building a bonfire like that, draped in Pakistan flags, next to an Asian area?
    Bonkers!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I know. It’s amazing they get away with this.

      Like the singing of their sectarian songs inciting hatred. The Famine Song, from my understanding, basically says, “go home paddies”. If they changed the last word to something similar but with a k in it, would the law take it so lightly?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I notice, at the home of Her Majesty’s Tax Avoiders, if you would like to munch on a Kiwi fruit or quaff any lime based beverage… well you can’t. I’m amazed they haven’t astro turfed the place in a tasteful blue hue, like pool tables in Hun pubs. Yet.

        Liked by 3 people

      2. See them marchin’ doon the road, wi’ their flags an’ drums an’ flutes,
        Wi’ their bowler hats, cheap nylon shirts, the caperin’ galoots.
        See their twirlin’ batons as they toss them up on high –
        The bigots are a’ oot in force because it’s Twelfth July

        Oh, it‘s auld but it’s no’ beautiful: it’s a badge o’ bile and hate,
        It harks back tae an aulder time an’ it’s sadly oot o’ date.
        Ye can chant it was worn by yer faither “in the bygone days of yore”,
        But it isnae 1690 noo – so, bin the sash yer faither wore.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I noticed the close structures, and thought of the tradition of the “Aggie Bonfire” at Texas A&M University. Traditionally a gigantic thing that got bigger every year. Of course there is a lot of space for the bonfire in and around College Station on the flatlands of East Texas. But in 1999, with a lack of professional supervision and a lot of enthusiastic alcohol-fueled students, the structure, which had reached 59 feet in height collapsed. After a rescue operation that took 24 hours, the final toll was 12 students killed and 27 injured.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aggie_Bonfire

        Even before the death toll was known, there was mindless rhetoric on campus about how the 90 year Aggie tradition would continue. And while it is no longer an official campus event, it has continued unofficially off-campus.

        Even if the stack doesn’t collapse while being built, how would you control it in a restricted area when it burns? Unbelievable!

        This is crazy even by Texas standards.

        Liked by 2 people

  6. In any situation which has a political component, we must consider that we live in a time of
    “post-truth politics,” where a simple “fact” no longer has relevance in political debate. The New York Times published a piece on this about a year ago.

    We in the states recently elected as president a nationalist populist demagogue who, as a professional real estate huckster and TV showman, realizes that facts are whatever you want them to be. When confronted with rejoinder about contrary objective truth, he reacts with anger…..even implied violence……about “fake news” from a mainstream media who are an “enemy of the people.” (I’m NOT making this up.)

    So I suggest that Munguin’s New Republic must get on board with new age politics and realize that whichever is the flag of the Ivory Coast and which the flag of Ireland is simply a matter of opinion, by which we can advance a particular political point of view. An appeal to fact is surely the last refuge of a scoundrel. 😉

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Danny,

      I don’t know whether you have come across this, but here is Owen Jones interviewing Naomi Kline.

      I felt a tad more hopeful after viewing that.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. The bigots in our country who identify themselves as British because they hate the Irish state and the Catholic religion in particular are those who burned our Saltire flag in George Square after the referendum.
    These people will burn any symbol which challenges their limited identity and perceived importance in the global community.
    A British state which now relies on the support of these Neanderthals has become the laughing stock of the civilized world and can no longer claim to be the mother of all parliaments and guardian of democracy.
    Guardian of sectarian bigotry more like and seen as being prepared to do business with anyone,no matter their lack of humanity.
    The Tories new mantra,Bung a Bigot.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Presumably the Embassy will be lodging a severe protest to the UK and NI governments for allowing this. Somebody should mention it to them.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Any one with a Fax machine can fax them this information.
      2 Upper Belgrave Street
      London SW1X 8BJ.
      Tel: 020 7235 6991 – Fax: 020 7259 5320

      Liked by 2 people

  9. I am completely shocked that this goes on in NI.
    Apparently they have around 35 of these monstrosities all over the province? Not only do they have tyres at the base, the structures are hollow and they fill them with more tyres.
    Let’s hope there is no wind that night and the bigots choke on their own glory.
    Poor miserable sods for want of a better description.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I thought it was illegal to burn tyres. It must be incredibly bad for anyone who breathes in the fumes.

      Can’t even be traditional. I mean they didn’t have rubber tyres in King Billy’s day!

      Let’s hope for a calm night where none of the toxic smoke blows over the sea to Scotland.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s